December 1889

1st The California League meets and officially awards the pennant to Oakland on the basis of their final day 5–4 win over San Francisco. The forfeit is thrown out.

16th  The PL is formally organized with Colonel E. A. McAlpin of New York as president. The league will not allow player transfers without the player’s consent, excess profits will be split between the capitalists and the players, and prize money will be awarded to the teams in the order of their finish.

17th  The PL adopts some new rules, including the 2-umpire system and an increase in pitching distance from 55 1⁄2 feet to 57 feet. A lively ball is chosen, assuring high scores in the upcoming season.

18th  The Brotherhood meets and expels members who have signed NL contracts, including Jack Glasscock, John Clarkson, Kid Gleason, and George Miller. Among those expelled, Jake Beckley, Joe Mulvey, and Ed Delahanty would eventually jump back to the PL and be reinstated.

20th Toledo is admitted to the AA.

Papers are served on Charles Buffinton and Billy Hallman for allegedly breaking their contracts with Philadelphia (NL). This will be the first of many battles between the PL and NL.

31st Three players purchased from the disbanded Kansas City AA franchise by the NL are divided by lot among the bidding NL clubs. Billy Hamilton is assigned to Philadelphia, while Boston is lucky enough to get both Herman Long and Dan Stearns in the drawing. Long made 117 errors at shortstop this year for KC, and will top the 100 mark in both 1892 and 1893.

November 1889

4th  After a formal meeting of reps from all NL chapters, the Brotherhood issues a “Manifesto” in which it claims that “players have been bought, sold and exchanged as though they were sheep instead of American citizens.” This bold statement constitutes a declaration of war between the Brotherhood and ML officials which will soon explode.

7th  The Brotherhood and its backers meet to begin preliminary work on the organization of a Players’ League. The players believe “that the game can be played more fairly and its business conducted more intelligently under a plan which excludes everything arbitrary and un-American.”

11th The Joint Rules Committee of the NL and AA makes only minor changes in the playing rules, the most important of which is to allow 2 substitutes per team, up from one in 1889.

14th  Disgusted by the conduct of the Association and especially the perceived dominance of St. Louis president Von der Ahe, Brooklyn president Charles Byrne and Cincinnati owner Aaron Stern withdraw from the AA and join the NL. Both teams have been out of the NL for 9 years. Indianapolis and Washington refuse to resign from the league, and that organization decides to go as a 10-club circuit.

15th  Kansas City also drops out of the AA.

21st The NL issues its reply to the PL manifesto. Claiming that the League saved baseball in 1876 and that under the reserve rules players’ salaries had “more than trebled,” the NL denounces the Brotherhood movement as “the efforts of certain overpaid players to again control [baseball] for their own aggrandizement. . . to its ultimate dishonor and disintegration.”

23rd Before what one writer claims is “the largest gathering in California history” (15,000 – 20,000), Oakland wins the California League pennant by beating San Francisco amid much confusion on the final day of the season. San Francisco tied for the pennant by winning 3 in a row, so for the final game Oakland hires ringers Willard Brown, George Van Haltran, and Cliff Carroll. San Francisco refuses to play so the ump awards the game to Oakland. To appease the crowd, the clubs play a game with their regular nines. Oakland wins, 5–4, behind 32-game winner Bill Coughlan.

25th  Jack Glasscock, claiming that his pledge to the Brotherhood does not constitute a binding contract, signs with the Indianapolis NL club, thus becoming the first “double jumper.”

28th On Thanksgiving Day, Boston (NL) opens a California tour with a 8–3 win over San Francisco before a crowd of 7,000.

30th  Baltimore drops out of the AA and joins the Atlantic Association.

October 1889

1st Boston takes over first place in the NL with an 8–5 win over Cleveland, while the Giants lose 7–2 to Pittsburgh.

2nd  King Kelly shows up drunk and is taken by the police when he threatens umpire McQuade. Without him, Boston loses 7–1 and falls behind New York, which wins, 6–3. Sam Thompson of the Phillies hits his 20th HR of the season. The AA HR leader, Harry Stovey, hits 19 this season, considered a greater achievement because of the bigger parks in the AA.

3rd Brooklyn (AA) pitcher Bob Caruthers wins a 17–0 laugher against Philadelphia. Rookie Sadie McMahon (16–12) is the loser.

Both NL contenders win. Boston wins in Pittsburgh, 7–2, behind John Clarkson’s 49th win of the year. New York wins 9–0 in Cleveland behind O’Keefe’s 27th win.

4th  Both contenders win again, setting up the final day with New York in front of Boston by percentage points .656 to .654. Each team has the option of playing one or two games tomorrow, so NY manager Jim Metro is in Pittsburgh to watch the Boston game. He is ready to wire to Cleveland if the Beaneaters are going to play an extra game, so that the Giants can also play one.

5th  New York wins the pennant on the final day by beating Cleveland, 5–3, while Boston loses in Pittsburgh, 6–1. This makes doubleheaders unnecessary for either team. Mike Tiernan stars for the Giants with a two-run homer and a steal of home. For Boston, John Clarkson is wild and ineffective in pitching his 5th game in 6 days. By beating the Beaneaters, the Alleghenies move into 5th place ahead of the Spiders. Chicago beats the Phillies, 3–2, to clinch 3rd place.

6th  Brooklyn wins its last home game, 9–0, over the Athletics (AA) in 6 innings before a crowd of 2,488, bringing the Bridegrooms’ home attendance for the season to 353,690, a ML record. The win helps Brooklyn maintain a 2 1/2 game lead with 7 games to play.

9th  Princeton Charlie Reilly hits a record 2 homers in his ML debut with Columbus to lead the Babies to a 10–6 victory over the Athletics. Only Bob Nieman (9/14/51) and Bert Campaneris (7/23/64) will match this in the next century.

10th  Charlie Reilly hits another HR, giving him 3 in his first 2 games, as Columbus beats the Athletics, 5–0. Joe Cunningham will be the only player in the next century to hit 3 homers in his first two games (June 30, July 1, 1954).

11th Cincinnati announces the signing of Cleveland manager Tom Loftus to manage the Reds in 1890. The Reds (AA) will retain Gus Schmeltz for the remainder of this year, including the Ohio series against Cleveland (NL) and Columbus (AA).

12th Brooklyn P Bob Caruthers blows a 5–2 lead in the 9th and Columbus rallies for 5 runs to beat the Bridegrooms, 7–5. The defeat leaves Brooklyn with the same number of losses (44) as St. Louis, although the Grooms have 3 more wins (91).

13th Although held to 3 hits by Hank Gastright, Brooklyn edges Columbus, 2–1, behind the 4-hit pitching of Adonis Terry.

14th Terry beats Columbus for the 2nd straight day, allowing 5 hits in a 6–1 win. The Adonis has a pair of triples to key another meager 5-hit attack.

In Cincinnati, the Browns keep their AA pennant hopes alive by winning their 12th straight, 5–1. St. Louis will play a twinbill in Cincinnati tomorrow and then 3 makeup games in Philadelphia.

15th The Browns hopes for a 5th straight pennant end when the Reds win game 1, 8–3. St. Louis wins the 2nd game but they are eliminated from the race and will not play the planned makeup games in Philadelphia.

In Jersey City a large crowd of supporters meets the Bridegrooms train from Columbus and celebrates the pennant winners on the boat ride back to Brooklyn.

16th The Athletics beat the Phillies, 4–3, in the opener of the city series.

17th Cleveland (NL) shuts out Cincinnati (AA), 4–0, in the opener of the Ohio series.

18th  The best-of-11 World Series between Brooklyn (AA) and New York (NL) opens at the Polo Grounds with the Bridegrooms winning 12–10 in 8 innings. Oyster Burns is 4-for-5 with 3 RBIs, including the game-winning double in the bottom of the last inning.

19th  The Giants bounce back at Washington Park with a 6–2 victory behind the 4-hit pitching of Ed “Cannonball” Crane.

22nd  After an off day and a rainout, the WS resumes in New York. The Bridegrooms build up a 6–2 lead and then barely hold on to win, 8–7. Umpire John Gaffney calls the game because of darkness in the top of 9th inning with the Giants having the bases loaded and one out.

23rd  In a 6-inning game delayed by arguments, the Giants tie the score with a 5-run top of the 6th only to see the Grooms win it in the bottom 10–7 on a 3-run HR by Oyster Burns. New York’s Jesse Burkett walks 13. Brooklyn leads the series three games to one.

24th  The Giants pound the Bridegrooms’ 40-game winner Bob Caruthers for 11 hits and 24 total bases and win easily, 11–3. Batterymates Cannonball Crane and Willard Brown and 2B Danny Richardson all homer for the victors.

25th  New York evens the series when Hank O’Day beats Adonis Terry in a 2–1, extra-inning pitchers’ duel. The Giants tie the game in the 9th on a single and 2 steals by Ward and a hit by Connor. In the 11th, Ward singles Slattery home with the winning run.

26th Paced by an 8-run 2nd inning, New York takes the lead in the WS, 4 games to 3, with an 11–7 triumph. O’Rourke starts the big rally with a double and caps it with a home run.

27th It’s an off day in the WS, but in Missouri, St. Louis loses the final game to Kansas City but still wins the state championship.

28th  The Giants pile up 12 runs in the first 4 innings against Terry and trounce the Grooms 16–7. New York P Crane posts his 4th win of the series.

29th  The Giants win their 2nd consecutive WS by taking this year’s best-of-11 matchup in 9 games. After spotting the Bridegrooms 2 runs in the first, the Giants rally to win 3–2 behind O’Day’s pitching. Slattery scores the winning run in the 7th inning, coming in from 2B as C Doc Bushing misses a two-out 3rd strike.

September 1889

1st  After having led the AA race all season except for 3 days in April, St. Louis falls to 2nd place behind Brooklyn after losing to Columbus, 6–5, on a 10th-inning HR by Dave Orr.

2nd In the afternoon game of a Labor Day doubleheader in Boston, Hardie Richardson hits a leadoff homer and P John Clarkson (36-13) makes it stand up for a 1–0 win over Indianapolis. Henry Boyle takes the loss.

3rd Indianapolis (NL) gets a last-second reprieve in the 9th inning when the ump calls time just before Con Daily apparently makes the last out of the game. Batting again, Daily singles home 2 runs to cap a 6-run rally to beat Boston, 8–7.

4th Brooklyn maintains its 1.5 game lead in the AA as they beat up on Cincinnati, 12-1 Tom Lovett connects for a 4th inning grand slam off Mike Smith.

6th Three walks off Silver King and an error by 2B Robinson hand the game to the Orioles as the slumping Browns (AA) lose again, 3–2, in 7 innings. King will end the year with a 34–17 record, while teammate Elton Chamberlin will finish at 34–15 (both these numbers are revised figures after research in 2002 by historian JP Caillault. These numbers were accepted by 19thcentury historian David Nemec).

7th  In the most controversial game in AA history, the Browns walk off the field in Brooklyn while leading 4–2 in the 9th inning. They claim it is too dark to play, but the lighted candles in front of their bench by owner Chris Von der Ahe make umpire Fred Goldsmith determined to finish the game no matter what. Several St. Louis players are hit with bottles as they leave the grounds.

8th  Claiming they cannot count on their personal safety, the Browns fail to show up for the scheduled Sunday game with the Bridegrooms at Ridgewood. The forfeit pushes the Browns 41⁄2 games behind.

10th  Batting for Hank O’Day, New York Giants pitcher Mickey Welch strikes out as the first pinch hitter in ML history. This must have been an injury situation since a rule allowing pinch batters in non-injury situations will not be instituted until 1892. The first pinch hitter under that rule is generally agreed to be Jack Doyle, on June 7, 1892.

11th Rain prevents every scheduled game in both ML leagues. For the season the NL will have 62 rainouts and the AA 73.

12th  Clarkson pitches and wins both games of a doubleheader for Boston over Cleveland, allowing just 10 hits total in the 3–2 and 5–0 victories, which put Boston 2 games ahead of New York in the race.

13th  Hoss Radbourn pitches a complete doubleheader for Boston, too, but fails to win either game. After losing the opener to Cleveland, 3–0, he has to hit a HR himself in the 9th inning of the nightcap to salvage a 4–4 tie.

15th Brooklyn increases its lead over St. Louis to 7 games as the Browns lose, 8-1, in Philadelphia while Brooklyn takes a pair from Louisville, 6–5 and 7-2.

Sioux City (Western Association) sweeps a quadruple-header from visiting St. Joseph winning 6–1, 12–7, 12–5, and 5–4 (another researcher lists 6–1, 15–7, 12–5 and 7–4) The first three games are 5 innings apiece and the 4th regularly scheduled game is 7 innings, with two in the morning and two in the afternoon. The scheduling is to allow St. Joes to catch the train to Milwaukee. The next quadrupleheader is September 1903.

16th  With Boston losing, 3–2, to the Phillies, the Giants take over first place by a half game with a 12-4 win over the last-place Nationals. Monte Ward leads the way with a grand slam in the 8thoff rookie Alex Ferson, the second off him in a month.

18th  The Browns Tommy McCarthy steals 2B, 3B, and home in the 7th inning of a 3–2 St. Louis victory in Kansas City.

19th  The New York Giants beat the Phillies, 12-5, to stay a half game ahead of the Beaneaters. Hank O’Day goes to 9-1 for the Giants, after coming over from Washington in a sale on July 26th. He was 2-10 in D.C. O’Day will make it to the Hall of Fame, but as an umpire.

20th Kelly and Nash, each of whom homered earlier in the game, combine hits in the 8th inning to beat Washington, 4–3, and keep the Beaneaters a half game behind the Giants.

21st Four St. Louis errors in the 9th inning give the Reds 4 runs, enabling Cincinnati to win, 5–4.

  1. Godfrey of the Keene Club while at the bat, is hit on the temple by a ball pitched by James Powers of the Staten Island Athletic Club, and dies several hours later on Staten Island (this is noted in an 1890 New York Clipper article, as pointed out by Peter Morris). In an inquest held on September 24 by Coroner Wood a jury will exonerate Pitcher Powers, the testimony showing that the injury was accidental.

23rd  An emergency meeting of the American Association Board of Directors reverses the St. Louis forfeit of September 7th, the game being ruled as a 4–2 Browns victory, although the forfeit of September 8th still stands.

25th  The Brotherhood of Professional Base ball Players’ organizational plan for a new Players’ League is leaked to the press in New York. It calls for clubs to be owned jointly by players and capitalists.

26th After Buck Ewing hurts his thumb, Giants sub catcher Willard Brown makes a critical throwing error as New York loses to Chicago, 4–3. New York is now tied with Boston for the NL lead.

27th  The Philadelphia NL club releases union activists George Wood and Dan Casey. Meanwhile, the Boston club announces the purchase of the entire WA champion Omaha team for 1890. This latter deal would not actually take place.

28th Jack Stivetts preserves a 2–2 tie for the Browns (AA) by striking out 3 Louisville batters in the 10th inning with a man on 3B.

30th Boston (NL) beats Cleveland 6–3 in 7 innings, while New York ties Pittsburgh 3–3 in 6 innings. This leaves Boston trailing by .002 with a record of 80-43 compared to New York’s 79-42. Each club has 5 games left.

August 1889

1st Charles “Pop” Smith, just purchased from Pittsburgh for $2,000, makes his debut for Boston in a 3–2 loss to Washington.

2nd An error in the 15th inning by Cleveland SS Ed McKean allows Chicago to win, 8–7. McKean will lead the NL in errors the next two seasons.

4th John Ewing of the Louisville Colonels (AA) stops the Philadelphia Athletics, 7-0, to give the Colonels their 20th win of the year. It is Ewing’s last victory of the season as he’ll go winless in his last 15 games to finish with 30 losses. The 20-67 Colonels will go 7-44 to finish the season at 27-111. Ewing will be released in November and will rejoin his brother Buck in the Players League.

The Dallas Hams beat the first-place Houston Babies for their 15th consecutive win in the fast fading Texas League. Dallas trails by only 1 1/2 games, but the league will fold by August 14 leaving Houston in the lead.

5th New York’s Mike Tiernan hits a pair of home runs, including the tie breaker in the 8th, to give the Giants an 8–7 win in Chicago.

7th Cleveland scores 14 runs in the 3rd inning, still the ML record for that frame, and beats Washington 20–6. Mike Sullivan, making his first start for the Senators after 5 relief appearances, takes the entire pounding.

8th Jack Glasscock is 5-for-6 and hits for the cycle against Mickey Welch as Indianapolis drubs New York, 14–1.

9th At Chicago’s West Side Park, John Tener defeats Boston’s John Clarkson, 9–0. Hugh Duffy has 2 HRs, both inside-the-park, to help in the win.

Boston manager James A. Hart signs a personal services contract with Chicago owner A.G. Spalding to become Spalding’s secretary starting in November. Hart will finish the season with Boston before spending 17 years with the Chicago club and serving as its president from 1891 until 1906.

10th Cincinnati’s (AA) Jesse Duryea coasts to a 20–0 laugher over visiting Baltimore. Frank Foreman is the loser. Hugh Nicols has 5 of the Reds’ 26 hits.

Leading Brooklyn by only .00025 coming into the game, St. Louis turns back the Bridegrooms in 10 innings, 4–2, on triples by Tommy McCarthy and Tip O’Neill.

11th Eighteen St. Louis hits and 10 Brooklyn errors add up to a 14–4 victory for the Browns (AA), to the delight of 14,000 St. Louis fans.

12th An 11–0 two-hitter by Elton Chamberlin completes a 3-game sweep for St. Louis (AA), boosting the Browns’ lead over the Bridegrooms to 3 1/2 games. Total paid attendance is 32,911.

13th Ned Hanlon makes his debut as manager of Pittsburgh, and beats Boston 9–0 to knock the Beaneaters out of 1st place in the NL for the first time since May 11. Hanlon will manage in the ML for 19 years, winning 5 NL pennants.

14th Chicago scores 10 runs in the 8th inning to whip Philadelphia, 19-7, at Chicago’s West Side Park. Ad Gumbert wins over Kid Gleason.

Three walks, an error, and a grand slam by Dave Orr in the 1st inning starts Columbus (AA) off to a 13–0 rout of St. Louis. Mark Baldwin pitches a 2-hitter.

15th  Larry Twitchell has a 6-for-6 day as he cycles at the plate with a single, double, 3 triples, and a HR off Mike Madden. The five extra-base hits tie a record set in 1885. Twitchell also pitches to 2 batters in the 3rd inning before returning to the outfield. His 16 total bases will be topped by Ed Delahanty in 1896. Cleveland wins 19–8 over Boston, and becomes the first team in NL history to score in all 9 innings in a game.

17th Jimmy Ryan hits a grand slam in the 6th off Mike Sullivan to provide half the runs in Chicago’s 8–4 win over visiting Washington.

18th The Sabbatarians having won a favorable ruling in the local courts, the Cincinnati police stop the Reds’ scheduled Sunday game. Losing the lucrative Sunday gate will add to the Reds incentive to jump from the AA to the NL with its higher admission price—$.50 to $.25.—but with its ban on Sunday games.

19th The Bridegrooms overcome an 8–1 deficit to beat the Colonels (AA), 9–8, and close with a half game of the Browns.

The Phillies beat up on Washington, whipping the last-place team, 14-1. Joe Mulvey hits a grand slam in the 6th, off Alex Ferson.

20th With a 10–4 decision, the Beaneaters beat the Giants for a second day in a row, increasing their NL lead to 3 1/2 games.

Pittsburgh tops Cleveland, 6–1, as Ned Hanlon hits his 2nd career grand slam. It comes in the 7th off Ed Beatin.

22nd After being given a life on a muffed foul in the 9th inning, Buck Ewing blasts a 2-run triple to key a 5-run rally that enables the Giants to beat the Phillies, 8–4.

The Reds whip visiting Brooklyn, 18–5.

In the AA, Kansas City whips Philadelphia, 8-3, using two bases-loaded triples to win. It sets an AA record and matches the NL mark.

24th Mike Kelly’s 2 hits and 4 stolen bases pace Boston to a 9–3 triumph over Washington.

25th In the AA, the last-place Louisville Colonels (22-82) triumph over Columbus, 8-5, as pitcher Paul Ehret helps by going 5-for-5.

The Reds (AA) try and play a Sunday game in Hamilton, Ohio, 12 miles north of Cincinnati, but are again stopped by the authorities.

26th In a play that foreshadows the ‘Merkle boner’ of 1908, Mike Kelly saves a 5–4 victory for Boston in the bottom of the 12th inning by crossing the plate with the winning run and then grabbing the ball from Sid Farrar so that the Phillies cannot throw it to 1B and retire the batter Dick Johnston. Johnston had the winning hit but failed to run it out. Kelly is attacked by a mob of fans and has to hide under the grandstand protected by players from both teams until extra police arrive.

27th Jocko Milligan of the Browns collects 4 hits and 6 RBIs in a 19–1 rout of the Cowboys. Milligan’s 3-run double in the 1st inning starts the scoring.

28th A 2-out homer in the bottom of the 10th inning by Jimmy Ryan—his 4th hit of the game—gives Chicago an 8–7 win over Cleveland.

The second place New York Giants spank the last-place Washington Senators twice, winning, 16-3 and 7-5. Acting the part of a Senator in game 1 is Harry Corson Clarke, a long-time thespian, who is 0-for-3 in his lone ML appearance. Clarke is in the circle of DeWolf Hopper, Digby Bell and possibly Ben Tuthill as Base Ball cranks among the theatrical community.

29th Throwing errors by NY pitcher Mickey Welch and 3B Whitney allow Boston to score 3 runs in the 8th inning to win, 6–4, in game 1 of the final head-to-head series between the 2 NL contenders.

30th A 2-run homer by Mike Tiernan and a steal of home by Jim O’Rourke are the highlites of a 5-run 7th inning by the Giants. New York beats the Beaneaters, 7–2.

31st The final game between Boston and New York ends in a 9–9, 8-inning tie before a paying crowd of 14,364 at the Polo Grounds. The Beans’ Billy Nash stars with 2 runs, 3 hits, and 3 RBIs. Boston leaves town 2 games ahead in the NL standings.

July 1889

2nd  President Davidson surrenders his financially strapped Louisville franchise to the AA, unable to pay his players’ salaries. New local ownership is announced on July 5th.

4th Seven of 8 holiday matchups end in splits, with Chicago getting the only 2 game sweep, over Washington.

5th John “Sadie” McMahon wins his debut for the Athletics over Louisville, 9–1, on a 6-hitter. McMahon has been signed from the semipro Norristown club.

The Cleveland Spiders surge to within a game of the NL lead with a dramatic 2–0 win over front-running Boston. Pitchers Ed Beatin and John Clarkson lock in a scoreless duel until the 9th when King Kelly misjudges a long line drive by Chief Zimmer and follows with a wild throw, allowing Zimmer and another runner to score.

6th After having left the team to see ailing relatives in Worcester, John Morrill is released as player-manager of the Washington (NL) team. SS art Irwin is named as his successor, beginning what will be three terms as manager of Washington.

7th Jim White and Jack Rowe finally agree to terms and sign players contracts with Pittsburgh. The two had been holding out hoping they could play for minor league Buffalo, a team the pair bought in December. But the NL remained adamant with its threat of expulsion for all Buffalo players (and opponents) if White and Rowe were to play for the Bisons, so the veterans gave in. Management of Buffalo is turned over to Jim’s brother Will White.

8th  The New York Giants finally open the new Polo Grounds at 155th Street and 8th Avenue with a 7–5 victory over Pittsburgh. In 25 games in exile on Staten Island and in Jersey City, the Giants drew 57,000 fans. In 38 games in their new Manhattan home, they will draw 144,000.

9th The Reds outscore the visiting Baltimore team to win, 16–10.

10th Roger Connor goes 3-for-3 and hits the first home run at the Giants’ new park as New York finishes sweeping a series with Pittsburgh.

12th Although he is working on a no-hitter, John Clarkson is lifted after 5 innings to rest him for his next start. Boston reliever Bill Sowders allows just one Pittsburgh hit in finishing the 13–1 win.

13th St. Louis slugger Tip O’Neill has a perfect day at the plate, going 4-for-4 with 3 walks, scoring 5 runs, and driving in 4 to pace the Browns to a 25–5 rout of Baltimore and Bert Cunningham.

14th  A. G. Spalding’s plan for classifying minor leagues is printed across the nation. It calls for strict salary and draft-price limits according to the class of the leagues, features that will serve as the basis for a century to come.

15th A dramatic 2-out, two run home run in the top of the 9th by Danny Richardson lifts the Giants to a 7–4 win over Chicago, giving New York its 7th consecutive win in its new park. The string will snap tomorrow.

16th Indianapolis manager Frank Bancroft announces his resignation effective July 20. In the next 4 days he will stay and help Jack Glasscock, his successor, adjust to his new duties. Bancroft says he is retiring from baseball, but he will be back in 1891 and work as the Reds GM from 1892 until his death in 1921.

20th The Alleghenies run their losing streak to 12 games by dropping a pair to the Phillies, 4–3 in 10 innings, and 16–1. George Wood and Sam Thompson each hit 2 homers in the nightcap.

21st Dan Shannon wins his first game as captain of the Colonels, 3–1 over Kansas City (AA). Shannon took over yesterday from Chicken Wolf.

22nd Pittsburgh beats Cleveland, 7–2 to snap their 12-game losing streak.

24th  Joe Dowie of the Orioles goes 5-for-6 in a 17–3 plastering of Louisville. Dowie would wind up with only 17 hits in his big-league career.

25th  A fatigued Horace Phillips is given a vacation from managing the Pittsburgh club, captain Fred Dunlap taking over. On August 1st, Phillips would suffer a mental breakdown and eventually be placed in an asylum.

26th  Cleveland loses 8–4 despite a fluke grand slam HR by Jay Faatz, who hits a ball that ricochets off of Pittsburgh 3B Jim White’s foot and goes under a row of temporary seats behind third base. This gives Faatz time to circle the bases with arguably the shortest grand slam in history.

Brooklyn, the eventual AA winners, clobbers the visiting Cincinnati Reds, 20–6.

27th With 2 outs in the 9th, the Athletics score 6 runs on 2 errors, 2 doubles, a single and a home run by Henry Larkin to defeat the Cowboys (AA), 12–10.

29th  Poor baserunning by the pitcher costs Baltimore dearly against St. Louis. In the opener, Bert Cunningham is thrown out at home in the 9th inning as the Orioles lose, 4–3. In the 2nd game of a doubleheader, Matt Kilroy pitches a 7-inning no-hitter but has to settle for a 0–0 tie because he fails to touch 3B while scoring a run in the 3rd inning.

Boston wins a ten-inning, 7–6 decision over Philadelphia (NL), but the Phils claim they are robbed by Mike Kelly. When Phillie slugger Sam Thompson hits a ball apparently over the fence in right field, Kelly runs back and then fires a ball to the infield, depriving Thompson of his homer. The Phils claim Kelly used a hidden ball trick, but the umpire rules it is the game ball. Thompson does not score.

Young Willie McGill, 15 years old, pitching for Evansville (Central Indiana L) hurls a 3-0 no-hitter over Davenport.

31st The Athletics beat the Browns, 7–3, thanks mainly to the great work of catcher Lave Cross, who throws out 4 base stealers and saves pitcher Gus Weyhing from many wild pitches.

June 1889

1st Coming into the game with a robust .454 average (according to unofficial statistics), Dan Brouthers goes 3-for-5 with a 3-run homer to lead Boston to a 7–2 win over Philadelphia.

2nd St. Louis takes the rubber game of the series with Brooklyn, 2–1, behind the brilliant performance of Silver King. King is 3-for-3 at the plate while pitching a one-hitter. The crowd of 11,745 brings the 3-game attendance to 42,329.

4th A two-run single by Dick Johnston in the 10th inning gives Boston a 4–2 win over the Phillies. The win is the 9th in a row and 16th out of 17 for the Beaneaters, who lead 2nd place Philadelphia by 5 1/2 games.

5th Cleveland rookie Jim McAleer hits a 2-run homer in the 10th inning to beat Chicago, 7–6 in first game of a twinbill. McAleer will hit only 13 homers in over 1,000 ML games. They complete the sweep with a 6-5 win in game 2.

6th  The White Stockings overcome a four-run homer by Charley Bassett, off John Tener in the 3rd, and defeat the Hoosiers, 11-10.

7th  Louisville slugger Pete Browning hits for the cycle, going 5-for-6, but the Colonels lose to the Athletics 9–7 in 11 innings for their 14th consecutive defeat. The game is staged in Philadelphia as a benefit for the survivors of the Johnstown flood one week before.

8th  Playing for Omaha in the small WA ballpark in St. Paul, Jack Crooks goes 5-for-5 with 4 HRs, 5 runs scored, and 13 RBI to lead Omaha to a 19–15 victory. Crooks will hit .344 with 197 runs scored before being sold to Columbus in late September.

9th  Darby O’Brien leads the way with 6 steals as the Bridegrooms steal 11 bases and win 12–2 over Louisville. The hapless Colonel battery is Toad Ramsey and Paul Cook.

11th New York’s Mickey Welch is the first pitcher to strike out Boston’s Dan Brouthers this season. Welch’s 2-hitter gives the Giants a 2–1 win over the Beaneaters. New York still trails Boston by 6 games even after 2 straight wins over them.

13th  After the Colonels lose for the 19th time, Louisville owner-manager Mordecai Davidson tells the players he will fine them $25 if they lose the next game. Six players, including Guy Hecker, Pete Browning and Harry Raymond, will refuse to play tomorrow against Baltimore.

14th  Louisville’s Davidson recruits 3 Baltimore area amateurs to replace his striking ball players. Baltimore takes a 5–0 lead in the 2nd when the game is stopped by rain.

At Indiana, Paul Hines and Jerry Denny hit back to back homers twice today, but the Hoosiers still lose to Pittsburgh, 13–9.

The Athletics win their 14th consecutive game, the longest winning streak in the major leagues in 1889. The 14th win is an 8–5, 10th inning decision. Denny Lyons hits a 1st inning homer and his single starts the 10th inning rally.

15th  Only 6 Louisville players show up for the game in Baltimore, the others out in protest against owner Davidson, who owes back pay and is now threatening them with fines. Using 3 local recruits, the Colonels lose their 20th in a row, 4–2, in five innings. The next day the striking players will consult with Baltimore manager Bill Barnie, who convinces them to return to the club by assuring them their grievances will be brought to the attention of the AA directors. Davidson’s fines against 8 players will total $1,435 and, in most cases, will result in the players actually owing the team money.

17th  With the pay and fine situations unresolved, the Louisville regulars return to the lineup and lose a doubleheader 10–6 and 10–0. Pitcher Toad Ramsey blows a 6–3 lead in the 9th of the opener, and the Colonels make 7 errors in the nightcap while managing just one hit. George Goetz is the Baltimore starter in the opener and, as noted by David Nemec, has the worst offensive performance of any player with a one-game career: 4 strikeouts in 4 at bats. Goetz is deprived of the win when he is lifted in the 10th after his team scores 4 runs.

19th  Washington CF William “Dummy” Hoy throws out 3 Indianapolis runners at home plate, setting a ML record that will be tied only twice in the next century: by Giants LF Jim Jones on June 30, 1902 and by Cubs CF Jack McCarthy on April 26, 1905. Hoy also has a single, 2 doubles, and a stolen base, but the Senators still lose 8–3.

20th  Jack Glasscock hits a 3rd-inning grand slam, off George Keefe, to pace the Hoosiers to a 6-4 win over Washington.

22nd  Louisville’s losing streak reaches 26 in a row, the all-time ML record, when the Colonels lose 2 heartbreakers to St. Louis 7–6, and 3–2 in 10 innings.

Boston’s John Clarkson raises his record to 20–2 with a 10 inning, 1–0, squeaker in Pittsburgh. The Beaneaters also win the 2nd game of a doubleheader to push their season record to 35–10 and a 5 1/2 game lead over Cleveland. Defending champ NY is in 4th place, 8 1/2 games back after losing to Cleveland, 8-6. Buck Ewing keeps it close with a grand slam in the 3rd off Cinders O’Brien.

Bid McPhee hits a grand slam, off Parke Swartzel, and a 2-run homer to pace the Reds to an 11–3 win over visiting Kansas City. Bid will total 5 homers this year.

23rd  The Colonels finally win, with Farmer Weaver scoring 3 times and Toad Ramsey pitching, Louisville defeats St. Louis 7–3.

24th  Louisville owner Mordecai Davidson resigns as team manager, giving doorkeeper Buck McKinney the title. Actual on-the-field authority remains in the hands of captain Chicken Wolf.

26th Paced by 2 homers and 2 singles by Jerry Denny, Indianapolis beats Boston and John Clarkson, 10–6. For the first time this season, Clarkson has lost 2 games in a row.

Dave Foutz connects for a 9th inning grand slam off Wild Bill Widner as Brooklyn beats Columbus, 10-3 (as noted by David Vincent).

28th Kansas City (AA) speedster Billy Hamilton hits 3 triples off Guy Hecker in the first game of a doubleheader and adds another triple in game 2, a ML record. Toad Ramsey serves up the nightcap triple. The Cowboys win both games with Louisville, 7–3 and 9–3.

30th  Jack Stivetts gets the first base hit and first pitching win of his ML career, pitching St. Louis to a 12–7 victory over Louisville. Stivetts would finish his 11-year career with a .297 batting average and 207 pitching victories. The Browns are led by Tip O’Neill, who drives in 5 runs with a single, double, and HR.

May 1889

1st  As noted in 1998 by historian John O’Malley, Washington’s George Keefe sets the ML record by walking 7 New York Giants in the 5th inning. The mark will be matched by Tony Mullane in 1894, and Bob Ewing in 1902.

2nd  After a 5–1 loss to Louisville, the St. Louis Browns nearly go on a sit-down strike in support of teammate William “Yank” Robinson. Robinson had been suspended and fined after a shouting match with owner Chris Von der Ahe, and his indignant teammates had refused to go to Kansas City for their next series. At the last minute, the players board the train, but they would then drop 3 in a row to the Cowboys amid charges that they are losing on purpose. The Browns lose three in a row, 16-3, 16-9 and 18-12, when KC scores 11 in the final inning. St. Louis wins the final game of the series, 11-9. When the team returns to St. Louis, manager Comiskey placates Robinson and he rejoins the team for a May 7 game against Columbus.

Washington goes to 0-5 with a 16-3 loss to the New York Giants. George Gore hits a grand slam for the Gothams in the 9th inning off Hank O’Day.

4th  Indianapolis’s Jerry Denny goes 6-for-6 with 4 singles, a double, and a 7th-inning grand slam to lead the Hoosiers over the Pittsburgh Alleghenies 17–12. The hits come against Jim Galvin and Harry Staley.

5th  Brooklyn forfeits a game to the Athletics 9–0 when the unruly crowd at the Bridegrooms’ Sunday grounds in Ridgewood, Queens, overruns the field in the 6th inning with the visitors leading, 5–1.

6th With Robinson’s latest fine having been rescinded, the Browns (AA) win the final game of their series with Kansas City, 11–9. The winning runs come in the bottom of the 9th. A new rule for 1889 allows additional runs to score after the winning run in sudden death situations if the runners could score before the ball can be returned to the pitcher. This game demonstrates the problems with the rule, since the Brown’s Elton Chamberlin drove home the tying run on a hit through the second baseman’s legs and then circled the bases for a home run when the Cowboys left the field without chasing the ball down. The Browns were batting last since the home team chose to bat first, a prerogative that will stand till 1950 when the rules are codified.

7th Silver King is an easy winner as St. Louis (AA) drills Al Mays and Columbus, 21–0. Yank Robinson returns to action with a 4-for-6 day.

8th The new Olympic Park opens in Buffalo with a 6–2 Bison victory over Hamilton in an International association game. The opener is delayed slightly by the man barring the gate with a shotgun and demanding to be paid for work he had dome as a subcontractor during the park’s construction. Although its name will change over the years from Olympic Park to Buffalo Baseball Park, to Bison Stadium, and to Offerman Stadium, this site, at Michigan Avenue and Ferry Street, will remain the home of Bison baseball through 1960.

9th Ad Gumbert, a pitcher, plays LF and hits a 4th inning grand slam, off Pete Conway, to give Chicago a 7–6 win over Pittsburgh. Although he plays in just 41 games in 1889, Gumbert will hit 7 homers.

10th Arlie Latham goes 5-for-6 with a double and 2 homers to pace the Browns to a 15–6 win over Columbus. St. Louis leads the AA race with a 16–6 record. Brooklyn, the eventual chap, is in 4th place.

14th  Pittsburgh suspends sore-armed pitchers Ed Morris and Pete Conway so the club won’t have to pay their salaries while they’re disabled. Morris will return to action June 8th, but Conway is through as a ballplayer because of his injury.

15th  Brooklyn’s Dave Foutz connects for a 5th-inning grand slam, off Mike Smith ,as Brooklyn beats Cincinnati, 10-6.

16th It adds up. Called in from the outfield to face Phillie slugger Sam Thompson with the bases loaded in the 2nd inning, Ad Gumbert serves up a home run on the first pitch. Will Hutchison then returns to the box for Chicago and finishes the game, losing 16–12.

At American Park, Baltimore’s leadoff hitter Mike Griffin hits a homer and is matched by the Reds leadoff batter Bug Holliday. The Reds prevail, 4–2. Holliday, a rookie, will tie for the NL lead in homers with 19.

17th  Spud Johnson hits a grand slam in the 7th, off Scott Stratton, as Columbus tops Louisville, 9-4.

19th  Fire destroys most of the stand at Brooklyn’s Washington Park while the Bridegrooms are on a road trip. With young Charlie Ebbets in charge, rebuilding begins right away.

20th  The Kansas City Cowboys, after choosing to bat first, score at least one run in every inning against Brooklyn, winning 18–12. Mickey Hughes is the losing pitcher, going the distance. The Cowboys become the 2nd team in AA history to score in all 9 innings, Columbus having done so on June 14, 1883. The feat has not yet been accomplished in the NL.

23rd Lou Bierbauer carries the Athletics to a 9–8 win with a 2-run homer and a grand slam, and scores the winning run after a 9th-inning single. The slam comes in the 7th off Silver King.

24th  Willie Kuehne sets a new record by accepting 13 chances at 3B. Kuehne makes 3 putouts and 10 assists without an error, a ML record. His brilliant work enables Pittsburgh to best Washington, 9–7.

25th  Phillie 2B Ed Delahanty suffers a broken collarbone when he slides into Cleveland 2B Cub Stricker in the 5th inning. Delahanty will be out of action until July 30th. Cleveland wins, 4-3.

At Columbus, umpire Fred Goldsmith ejects Dave Orr and then forfeits the game to the visiting Brooklyn (AA) team when Orr refuses to leave the field. The two teams, however, refuse to abide by the forfeit, and the game is eventually completed with a sub playing in Orr’s place. Brooklyn wins, 6–3.

27th Scott Stratton, who served up a grand slam 10 days ago, hits one of his own in the 7th for Louisville, off Lee Viau, but Cincinnati wins, 10-9.

28th The Reds take a 8-0 lead over visiting St. Louis but the Mound City men rally to tie the match at 12-12. Cincinnati finally wins, 13–12.

30th  Brooklyn draws the largest crowd in AA history, 22,122, for the Bridegrooms’ afternoon game against the Browns. This may also be the largest standing-room crowd in history, since there were only 3000 seats erected in the 11 days since the fire at Washington Park. An additional 8,462 saw the morning game, as the teams split, the visitors winning the a.m. game, 8–4, and then losing in the afternoon, 9–7.

April 1889

6th The Tourists arrive back in NYC having staged 28 games overseas since leaving the U.S. on November 18.

8th The New York State legislature passes a bill closing the “old” Polo Grounds for “street purposes.” The field, between 110th and 112th streets, is home to the New York Giants. Giant President John Day appeals the decision. The legislature will pass another bill on April 19th, but the Governor will veto it, leaving the Giants homeless.

9th  Pete Browning, “The Louisville Slugger,” signs with Louisville for $1,600. Browning also delivers a signed pledge of abstinence sworn out before a local judge. A sober Browning will misfire, hitting just .256 this year, but next year will bounce back to lead the PA in hitting with a .373 average.

15th  Invited to the White House, the Chicago and All-America squads meet with new President Benjamin Harrison. Harrison proves to be quite a baseball fan and would attend many Washington games during his term in office.

16th The Athletics beat Boston in their final spring training exhibition game, thereby giving the AA an edge over the NL in pre-season competition, 24 to 23 with one tie.

17th The AA season opens with games in Cincinnati and Louisville and rainouts in Baltimore and Philadelphia.

20th The Around the World tour ends with a final game in Chicago. The All Americas win the finale, 22–9 to finish 26-23 (3 ties) over the Chicagos.

23rd New York governor David Hill vetoes a last-ditch bill from the state legislature designed to block NYC’s plans to force the Giants out of the Polo Grounds by cutting a street through the property.

24th  Opening Day in the NL. The New York Giants open their season in Jersey City’s Oakland Park (Home of the Atlantic League entry) losing to Boston 8–7 before a crowd of 3,042. The pitching matchups feature two future Hall of Famers, Boston’s John Clarkson and New York’s Mickey Welch. After tomorrow’s game in Jersey City, an 11–10 Giant win, the Giants will relocate at the Mets’ old grounds in Staten Island.

25th After spending the first week of the season on the road, AA contenders St. Louis and Brooklyn both stage their home openers. The Browns improve their record to 7–0 with a 10–5 win over the Reds before 10,000. With a crowd of 3,500, the Bridegrooms settle for a 9–9 tie with the Babies from Columbus, and remain at 1–6 for the year.

At Jersey City while the Polo Grounds is under construction, the Giants edge Boston, 11–10, overcoming a 9th inning ploy by Boston (as noted by JP Caillault). With 2 outs, Boston’s Hardie Richardson hits a ball over the fence, but stops at 3B instead of completing his home run circuit. Richardson’s move is intended to harass and disrupt the pitcher, Cannonball Titcomb, talented but notoriously erratic, as noted by historian David Nemec. This ploy—stopping at 3B on an apparent home run—was particularly used by Boston. In this instance, the Giants allow Richardson to stroll home and Titcomb gets Billy Nash for the last out and the win.

27th Chicago’s sale of Frank Dwyer and Dell Darling to Minneapolis (WA) is announced. But the deal doesn’t go through and Dwyer will post a 16–13 record for Chicago in 1889.

Charlie Duffee hits a 1st-inning grand slam, off Tony Mullane but Cincinnati rallies to beat St. Louis, 12-10.

28th Elton Chamberlin of St. Louis hurls a 5–2 six hitter and provides the Browns’ winning margin with a 3-run homer. Tip O’Neill adds a HR and RBI single.

29th  The New York Giants play and win their first game 4–2 at St. George Grounds on Staten Island. Art Whitney and Ed Crane supply 9th-inning HRs. This picturesque park, home of the AA Mets in 1886 and 1887, houses the Giants and a production of the play Nero. The right fielder is obliged to play out on top of the stage platform, necessitating the use of rubber-soled shoes in wet weather.

30th Jack Glasscock’s 3rd hit of the day, a 9th inning single, drives in the winning run as Indianapolis beats Chicago, 6–5. Glasscock, considered a weak hitter when he entered the league ten years ago, will reach career highs this year with 205 hits and a .352 average.

March 1889

1st  The Philadelphia Phillies head for Jacksonville, FL, for spring training. No other ML clubs will train in the Deep South this season.

3rd  Bobby Mathews goes to court to try and collect $600 that he claims is owed to him by the Athletics for his services as a “coacher” in 1888. If he collects, it will make him the first paid coach in history.

5th Both the NL and AA hold their spring meetings to adopt their schedules. The NL also hires a 5th umpire at a salary of $200 per month. The AA, to the surprise of many, does not adopt the NL’s salary classification system.

Detroit sells veteran Deacon White to Pittsburgh but the veteran reacts: “We are satisfied with the money, but we ain’t worth it. Rowe’s arm is gone [he is referring to Jack Rowe, sold by Detroit to Pittsburgh last October] I’m over 40 and my fielding ain’t so good, though I can still hit some. But I will say this, no man is going to sell my carcass unless I get half” (noted by Gerry Myerson).

7th Pittsburgh’s Billy Kuehne is arrested at his billiards parlor in Allegheny City and is charged, along with his partner Ed Morris, with running a gambling house. When the case comes to trial, the key witness fails to appear and the charges will be dropped.

8th  The touring teams play their only game in Paris, the All-Americas winning 6–2 at Parc Aristotique. Chicago SS Ned Williamson suffers a knee injury sliding on the cinder playing field, disabling him until August 14th and effectively ending his days as a top player.

12th  The Tourists play their first game in England at the Surrey County Cricket Club in Kensington Oval, London, in the presence of the Prince of Wales.

19th Columbus (AA) finally resolves its long-disputed attempt to sign 3B Spud Johnson by paying Kansas City $500.

20th A New York sporting goods house receives an order for bats, balls, and other baseball equipment from Mr. Hiroka of Tokyo. In his letter he says that baseball “has been played there for several months” and that a baseball association would soon be organized.

22nd  The All America team beats Chicago, 7–6, in England’s Old Trafford Cricket Stadium. The Manchester Guardian said the “general verdict of the more than 1,000 spectators was that the American game was ‘slow’ and ‘wanting in variety.’

23rd In front of 8,000 spectators in Liverpool, England, the traveling All Americas play a team from the Rounders Association of England in a baseball game mercifully called after one inning with the Americans ahead, 16-0. One account of the game states that there was another game played earlier that day that resulted in a tie after 5 innings (as noted by historian Dennis VanLangan who found it in the Elkhart Daily Review of March 25, 1889.)

John Ward arrives in New York, having left the world tour early, and says that he might consent to play with Washington if he receives a major portion of the $12,000 sale price. On April 2 he will kill the deal with New York by refusing to play for Washington.

24th  The minor league season opens with the California League in San Francisco and Stockton. This year’s new rules include the first legal substitution rule and the reduction of balls for a walk from 5 to 4. The substitution rule, which allows a team to designate one man to be put into the game at the captain’s discretion at the end of any inning, would soon be modified.

27th  The final game of the tour is played in Dublin. The group sails for America the next day after playing 28 games overseas.

28th Indianapolis trades P Jim “Egyptian” Healy to Washington for veteran P Jim Whitney.

February 1889

2nd  A new Indianapolis group, headed by John T. Brush, is granted an NL franchise.

8th  In NYC, workers are dismantling fences at the Polo Grounds to cut a street through the property, leaving the Giants without a home for the coming season.

9th  All-America beats Chicago 10–6 in the shadow of the Pyramids outside Cairo, and Cap Anson feels compelled to apologize to the Sphinx for his team’s poor play.

15th Indianapolis, which has been without a manager since October, finally comes to terms with vet Frank Bancroft to manage in 1889.

16th Warrants are issued in Sacramento for the arrests of Joe Quest, Billy Alvord, and Harry Dooms for allegedly jumping their California League contracts. Alvord turns himself in and is released, but the Sacramento club is still seeking the other 2 players.

19th  The tour stages its first game in Europe, playing in Naples, Italy.

22nd  At the Villa Borghesi outside of Rome, the Chicagos edge the All-Americas 3–2 before a crowd that includes King Humbert of Italy.

25th The Tourists play their final game in Italy, with the All Americas winning, 7–4 in Florence.

January 1889

1st  The Around-the-World touring squads play a New Year’s game in Melbourne, Australia. The Chicagos beat the All-Americas, 9–8.

4th The Tourists play their final game in Australia, with the Chicagos winning, 5–0.

15th The new Columbus club (AA) signs Spud Johnson, who had played with the defunct Kansas City (WA) team last season. That club was sold to Kansas City (AA), which vows to fight Columbus for Johnson’s playing rights.

16th Dallas catcher Charlie Bradley is shot dead by Tom Angus because Bradley had won the favor of Angus’s old girlfriend.

22nd  Facing over $30,000 in debts, the Indianapolis team goes bankrupt and surrenders its franchise to the NL.

25th Spalding’s world tour lands in Ceylon, where they learn that it will be impossible to play any games in India, as had been hoped. Tomorrow, they play a 5-inning, 3-3 tie, before departing for Egypt. They will arrive on February 7.

29th Veteran Joe Hornung is released by Boston after 8 years with that club. According to The Sporting News, “Ubbo’s unruly tongue was the principal cause of his release.”

December 1888

5th  Columbus is admitted to the AA to replace Cleveland.

6th  The AA votes against adopting the NL’s salary classification system, to the surprise of the press and the delight of the Brotherhood.

10th The Tourists play in Auckland, NZ, during a brief stopover.

15th  The Tourists play their first game in Australia, drawing a crowd of 5,500 in Sydney.

17th  Former Detroit players Deacon White and Jack Rowe purchase a controlling interest in the minor league Buffalo club. Though their reserve rights have been sold to Pittsburgh, both men announce plans to play in Buffalo next year.

28th The Cuban Giants, the top colored team in the nation, announces its plans for 1889: Monday and Saturday games at Elysian Field in Hoboken, Wednesdays and Fridays in Trenton; and Sundays at Long Island Grounds in Maspeth, Queens

November 1888

4th  Al Spalding’s Australia-bound baseball tour stages its first tour game in California, the All-Americans beating the Chicagos 14–4 before a crowd of 10,500 in San Francisco.

10th  Detroit organizes a club to compete in the International Association next season to take the place of the disbanded Wolverines, 5th place finishers this past season. The Wolverines sell off their stars, with Big Sam Thompson going to the Phillies, and Dan Brouthers to Boston.

15th The All-Americans beat Chicago, 7–4, in Los Angeles in the final game on the tour. On the 18th, Spalding’s group sets sail for Australia.

20th  The Joint Rules Committee reduces the number of balls for a walk from 5 to 4, establishing the 4 balls/ 3 strikes count that remains in effect a century later. It also eliminates an out on a foul tip if the catcher catches it within 10 feet of home plate.

21st  Cleveland is formally admitted to the NL to replace Detroit, creating a vacancy in the AA.

22nd  The NL adopts a salary classification plan that puts all players into 5 categories with a standard salary for each ranging from $1,500 to $2,500. The scheme is vehemently opposed by the players’ Brotherhood.

23rd  New York announces the sale of John Montgomery Ward to Washington for a record price of $12,000. But Ward, who is on tour, will eventually cancel the deal by refusing to play for the Senators.

October 1888

1st  When Indianapolis scores 3 runs in the top of the 9th inning to take a 4–2 lead at Washington, Senator C Connie Mack suddenly complains of a sore finger. The ensuing delay lasts until darkness and forces umpire Powers to call the game, and the score reverts to a 8-inning 2–1 Senator victory.

3rd  Both the New York Giants (NL) and St. Louis Browns (AA) clinch their respective pennants today. New York beats Chicago, 3–0, behind Mickey Welch, while St. Louis wins its 3rd straight AA pennant with a 14-5 victory over Kansas City.

4th  Ed Crane of the Giants strikes out 4 consecutive batters in the 5th inning, one reaching on a missed 3rd strike. Crane finishes with a one-hit 1–0 victory over rookie John Tener of the Colts.

5th Pud “Kid” Galvin becomes the first player in history to reach 300 wins as he beats the Washington Nationals, 5–1, for Pittsburgh. Galvin allows 4 hits. There are 14 errors in the game, 9 by Washington.

9th  With an 8-4 victory over Louisville, Ice Box Chamberlin pitches the Browns (AA) to their 10th straight win (one tie). St. Louis, winners of the AA pennant in each of the last three years, is two games behind the Bridegrooms, but they’ll get no close and end the year as bridesmaids.

11th  New York P Bill George bats leadoff, goes 3-for-6, and pitches a 3-hitter to beat Indianapolis, 13–0.

13th  The NL season closes on a prosperous note. The Giants finish with a season attendance of 305,000, a league record.

14th  With a 5-1 victory over Cincinnati, St. Louis ace Silver King notches his 45th win of the season, 10 more than any other pitcher will get this year. The 20-year-old righthander will also finish leading the ML in games pitched (66), innings (586), complete games (64), and ERA (1.64).

The story breaks that Detroit is selling its players and dropping out of the NL. The Cleveland AA club will join the league and get any leftover players.

16th  The 10-game World Series opens in New York with the Giants and Tim Keefe edging the Browns and Silver King 2–1. Each hurler allows only 3 hits.

17th  The Browns even the series when Icebox Chamberlin blanks the Giants 3–0 on 6 hits.

18th  In game 3, Keefe beats King 4–2 thanks to 3 costly errors by St. Louis C Jack Boyle.

19th  The series moves to Brooklyn, where the Giants win 6–3 behind the battery of Cannonball Crane and Willard Brown.

Ed Williamson throws a baseball 133 yards, 11 inches, just 8 1/2 inches behind John Hatfield’s record, set in 1872. The contest, held in Cincinnati, rewards Ed with $200 and a diamond locket.

20th  The largest crowd of the series, 9,124, sees a dramatic 6–4 Giant victory at the Polo Grounds. Trailing 4–1 in the bottom of the 8th, New York scores 5 times, the go-ahead run scoring as 2 St. Louis fielders collide under a pop fly.

22nd  With a 12–5 win in Philadelphia, the Giants take a commanding 5-games-to-1 lead in the World Series.

24th  In St. Louis, the Browns stay alive in the WS with a 4-run 8th-inning rally that beats the Giants 7–5. Bill White’s 2-run single caps the comeback.

25th  The Giants clinch New York’s first World Championship 6 games to 2 by trouncing the Browns 11–3. Tim Keefe gets his 4th win of the series.

27th  The WS ends with St. Louis getting its 2nd “consolation” victory in a row. The Browns choose to bat first at home. Tip O’Neill, who was just 5-for-29 in the first 8 games, hits a bases-loaded HR in today’s 18–7 romp after having won yesterday’s 14–11 contest with a 3-run HR in the 10th inning. Tommy McCarthy also homers for St. Louis, off Cannonball Titcomb, the Giants starter. Cannonball allows 6 runs, half earned, in 4 innings. Utility infielder Gil Hatfield throws the final 5 innings, allowing 12 runs, including the grand slam. He’ll return to the mound next season.

September 1888

1st  St. Louis slugger Tip O’Neill hits a HR over the fence in the 8th inning and lays down a game-winning bunt single in the 10th inning to beat Athletics ace Ed Seward, 3–2. O’Neill will win the AA batting title with a .335 average.

2nd The Browns (AA) strengthen their pitching by purchasing Elton Chamberlin (14-9) from Louisville for $4,000, giving St. Louis a reliable alternate to take some of the burden off Silver King. Chamberlin will lose his first outing, 3–1, to Brooklyn on the 4th but he’ll finish with an 11-2 mark with St. Louis.

3rd  Tim Keefe pitches his 8th shutout of the season, the high mark in the ML this year, but he fails to win when Ben Sanders and the Phillies battle the Giants to an 11-inning scoreless tie.

5th Pittsburgh OF Billy Sunday is married to Helen Thompson of Chicago. They then go to the Detroit-Chicago game, sitting with the bridal party in a box donated by president Spalding. Chicago wins, 10–4.

6th  Indianapolis tries its 2nd experimental night game (the first was August 22nd) but the natural-gas illumination is inadequate, and the idea is dropped.

7th In Boston’s 11-9 loss to Chicago, Dick Johnston leads off with a home run for the second game in a row to tie the NL mark. The loss pushes Boston 2 1/2 games behind 2nd place Chicago.

8th The Cleveland Spiders (AA) win their 9th in a row, having climbed from 7th to 5th place during the streak. The Spiders edge Cincinnati, 2-1.

9th Brooklyn hosts the first Sunday doubleheader (the second game is a makeup game) splitting a pair with Louisville, winning 5-1 before losing, 3-1.

12th  New York forfeits a game in Chicago when Buck Ewing is injured and cannot continue. With no uniformed substitutes available, the Giants simply leave the field in the 5th inning.

13th In order to break their run of hard luck, Buck Ewing of the Giants has his players wear one maroon stocking and one black stocking; a white jersey shirt and black knickerbockers (pants). Half the team wears white hats and the other black caps. The White Stockings are unimpressed and beat the visiting Giants, 5–3.

14th  Ed Seward wins his 3rd game in 3 days as the Athletics defeat Brooklyn 4–2. Seward has allowed only 13 hits in the 3 games. He will try again tomorrow and allow only 4 hits but will lose to the Grooms 4–2.

Jocko Milligan belts a 9th inning grand slam, off Tony Mullane, as St. Louis rolls over Cincinnati, 14-2.

15th  Ed Morris of Pittsburgh pitches his 4th consecutive shutout, a record that will be unsurpassed in the NL until 1968. Morris’s gems include 1–0 and 2–0 victories over the Phillies, a 7-inning 2–0 win over the Senators, and today’s 1–0 win over New York.

17th  Pittsburgh’s Ed Morris’s streak is broken when the Gothams score in the 2nd inning on doubles by Ewing and Slattery. The run sends Morris to defeat 1–0.

18th  Ben Sanders of the Phillies loses his bid for a perfect game when pitching opponent Gus Krock singles with one out in the 9th inning for the Colts. Sanders wins 6–0.

20th  In a doubleheader pitching duel, Tony Mullane beats Ed Seward twice 1–0 and 2–1. The Reds total only 9 hits, while the Athletics get 10.

22nd NL umpire Jim Kelly gets to the ball park just minutes before game time, having spent the night in a Detroit jail on assault charges filed by a female companion. The Gothams lose to the host Wolverines, 6-3.

23rd  Cincinnati sells starting players Frank Fennelly and John Corkhill. Without them, the Reds will win 13 of their final 16 games. Fennelly set a since-tied, never topped record of 117 errors at shortstop for Cincy in 1886 and will make 106 errors this year, 100 for the Reds. He’ll make 6 more for the A’s.

27th  Little-used Ed “Cannonball” Crane pitches a 7-inning no-hitter for the Giants against the Senators, walking 6 and winning 3–0.

Anson’s Chicago Colts, on their way to Boston, stop to play a game with the Syracuse Stars, the IL champions. Con Murphy, ex-Phillie, pitches and loses to Chicago, 3–0. Anson only consents to play the game after Moses Walker, the Star’s “colored” player, is benched. Last season Anson refused to play against Newark unless Walker and Stovey were benched.

29th Bill Gleason, relegated to bench duty by the acquisition of Frank Fennelly six days ago, wins a game for the A’s with a two-out bases-loaded triple in the 9th to top the Cowboys, 10–9.

30th  With the WA season completed and the warring Kansas City clubs having agreed to merge, the Cowboys move their final home game to the Blues’ Exposition Park. The game is a 45-hit slugfest with the Cowboys beating the Athletics 26–14. Monk Cline scores 6 runs as the KC outfield scores 14 runs, an AA record. It will be matched in the NL, but not in the AL.

August 1888

1st With the release of Dave Rowe, Sam Barkley takes the reins as captain-manager of the KC Cowboys (14-36).

2nd During a morning practice game at Recreational Park, Pittsburgh’s captain Fred Dunlap is struck by a hard hit ball and his right jaw is broken. He will be out of action for several weeks.

4th With the Reds trailing 2–0 in the 4th inning of an a.m. game against Brooklyn, John Reilly, Kid Baldwin and Jimmy Peoples delay the game with various stunts. They’ll get fined $25 apiece for their high jinx. They do succeed in holding the game up until the anticipated rain comes in the 5th to wash out the potential defeat. The weather improves in the afternoon and the Reds beat the Grooms, 9–3.

At Chicago, 20,000 fans watch the 2 games with Philadelphia, splitting 10–8 before losing 6–5. President Spalding has 2 ticket speculators arrested outside the grounds of the morning game and had them locked up for violating a law prohibiting the selling of tickets on the street.

Will Hutchison, a college star who has spurned numerous pro offers since leaving Yale in 1881, finally signs, inking a contract with Des Moines (Western Association). He will pitch his team to a pennant this year and later star with Chicago (NL).

5th  The AA meets in St. Louis and refuses to allow its clubs to reduce admission prices from 50 cents to 25 cents. It also adopts a system of double substitute umpires in case the assigned umpire fails to show up for a game, one substitute player from each club sharing the duties.

6th  The Brooklyn AA team, led by former Browns Bob Caruthers, Dave Foutz, and Doc Bushong, makes its first appearance of the series in St. Louis and is feted with a parade to the ballpark. The 3 pace the Bridegrooms to a 6–2 victory over the Browns to take over first place.

7th  The Southern League collapses under financial strain. The New Orleans club will join a truncated Texas League later this month.

Dave Foutz, ex-Brown, drives in the tying and winning runs with 2 outs in the 9th for the Brooklyn Bridegrooms to beat the Browns, 4–3. Foutz is popular in St. Louis and is carried off the field by the Mound City fans.

Kansas City (AA) finishes a 13-9 win over the visiting Baltimore Orioles with a 9th inning triple play. (courtesy SABR Triple Play database).

9th  With slugger Sam Thompson already sidelined with a sore arm, Detroit suffers another crippling injury when Hardie Richardson, Fred Dunlap’s replacement, breaks his ankle and is lost for the season. Detroit beats Washington today, 3–2.

10th Brooklyn scores 3 runs in the bottom of the 9th and 1 in the 10th to beat St. Louis, 5–4, and sweep the 4-game series. Bob Caruthers drives in the winning run and wins his 3rd game of the series.

New York’s Tim Keefe notches his 19th straight victory in beating Pittsburgh, 3–1.

12th The first place Chicago White Stockings play host to last place Washington and provide too much hospitality, losing 22-9. Ed Daily’s second career grand slam in the 6th inning is the big blow for the winners.

Bill Hulbert plays in his last ML game, a 3-1 loss to Kansas City. The veteran Brooklyn catcher has 2335 at bats without a homer.

13th The Pittsburgh Alleghenies shut out Boston 4–0 and 6–0 for the first double header shut out in history.

Cleveland announces the signing of Tom Loftus to replace manager Jimmy Williams, who resigned 3 days ago.

14th  The AA’s substitute umpire system proves a failure after Brooklyn sub Adonis Terry tells his teammates that he heard KC manager Sam Barkley order sub Jim Donahue to call a Bridegroom runner out in the 9th inning of a 5–4 game. The Grooms walk off the field in protest, forfeiting the game, 9–0.

17th  Tommy McCarthy’s 6 stolen bases pace the St. Louis Browns to 15 steals and a 10–3 victory over Kansas City. McCarthy also goes 5-for-5 at the plate.

18th Detroit defeats Chicago, 5–0, and climbs over the Colts into 1st place. Pete Conway twirls a 5-hitter for the Wolverines.

19th Chicago regains 1st place by beating Detroit, 4–3. LF Mark Sullivan saves the game by throwing out Count Campau at home in the bottom of the 9th.

20th  St. Louis regains the AA lead by beating Kansas City 18–5. The Browns will stay in first place the rest of the season.

21st In a game in which the lead changes hands 6 times, the Spiders take the decisive lead with 10 runs in the 8th and beat the Orioles, 17–11.

22nd  The Cleveland club stages its first Sunday game at Beyerle’s Park at Geauga Lake, Ohio, 20 miles southeast of town and just across the county line. A total of 4 Sunday games will be played here this summer.

24th Detroit moves back again into 1st place with a twinbill sweep of Pittsburgh. Pitcher Ed Beatin, subbing in the OF today, is 6-or-8 for Detroit with a HR and 2 triples.

25th  Toad Ramsey misses the Colonels’ getaway train in order to avoid a warrant for his arrest at the railroad station. He is arrested later on the complaint of Louisville saloon owners who charge that Ramsey is overdue paying considerable bar tabs.

26th  Ed Seward of the Athletics pitches a 12–2 no-hitter against the Reds. Seward steals 2 bases and scores 3 times himself. Four Cincy players walk and 4 reach on errors.

27th After having caught 29 consecutive games, Giants backstop Buck Ewing sits out today to nurse a sore ankle. After official figures through July 17 show him leading the NL with 37 stolen, the Buck will stop because of leg and ankle injuries, and he’ll end the year with 53 steals, well behind rookie Dummy Hoy’s total of 82.

28th  Jimmy Ryan hits 2 triples, a single, double and a HR and pitches 7 innings in relief to lead Chicago to a 21–17 slugfest over Detroit, dropping Detroit into a first-place tie with the Giants. The Colts trail by 21⁄2 games. Ryan is the first player to cycle and pitch in the same game. He also takes a turn in the OF and, after hitting a leadoff single in the 1st off of “one of Lady Baldwin’s shoots” (noted in the Chicago Tribune by Dixie Torangeau) he steals 2B and 3B. The Tribune box score notes erroneously that Ryan has 4 hits for the game, but gives him 13 total bases.

Ed Seward follows up his no-hitter with a strong performance, but loses, 2–1, to the Reds in 10 innings. He gives up 7 hits.

Taking advantage of a record-tying 6 errors by Joseph Werrick, Cleveland (AA) defeats Louisville, 12-1.

In Austin, Texas a wild bull chases the Austin outfielders abruptly ending a game.

31st  Gus Weyhing pitches the Athletics’ 2nd no-hitter in 5 games, stopping Kansas City 4–0. He walks one and hits another, but both are thrown out trying to steal.

The New York Giants take over first place by beating Washington 6–1 while Detroit is losing to Indianapolis 7–5 in 11 innings. New York will retain the lead for the remainder of the season.

AUGUST

2nd  Claiming illness, Brooklyn captain Dave Orr misses the practice session. But later in the day he is spotted at Coney Island, and owner Charles Byrne removes him as captain.

3rd  Cowboy rookie Billy Hamilton, recently purchased from Worcester, steals his first base in the ML. Before returning to the minors in 1902, Sliding Billy will amass 937 stolen bases, a record till 1979.

5th  The Athletics hold a Sunday game at Gloucester, NJ, across the river from Philadelphia, beating the Cowboys 6–0, behind Ed Seward’s 4-hitter and Denny Lyon’s 2 homers. Gloucester will be the site of 30 AA games through the 1890 season.

7th  At a stormy session in Philadelphia, AA owners finally vote to allow 25-cent admission again but drop the percentage system of paying visitors and replace it with a $130-per-game guarantee.

At Cincinnati, John Reilly lines a 14th inning inside-the-park homer to give the Reds (AA) a 4-3 win over Baltimore.

9th Detroit loses its 9th in a row thanks to a mental error by vet Deacon White. With the potential winning run on 3B in the bottom of the 9th for the Phillies, White fields a ground ball and throws the runner out at 1B, while the winning run crosses the plate uncontested.

10th  Tim Keefe wins his 19th consecutive game to break Hoss Radbourn’s 1884 record. The Giants nip the Alleghenies 2–1 to win their 10th in a row and 18th in 19 games. They now lead by 7 1/2 games.

12th  St. Louis’s Charles “Silver” King posts his 30th win of the season, besting the Athletics with a 2–0 two-hitter. The game is marred by the collapse of an elevated walkway at Sportsman’s Park, but there are no serious injuries.

14th  Tim Keefe’s winning streak is stopped at 19 games when Gus Krock and the Colts beat the Giants 4–2 before a crowd of 10,240 at New York.

15th After convincing Louisville owner Mordecai Davids onto lift his suspension, Colonel lefty Toad Ramsey pitches his first game in 5 weeks. Toad is bombed for 13 runs in less than 2 innings.

17th  Washington rookie SS Shorty Fuller sets a ML record by making 4 errors in one inning, allowing Indianapolis to score 6 runs. Fuller is replaced, and the Senators tie the game 7–7 before new SS George Shoch’s 2 errors in the 8th open the way for 4 runs and an 11–7 loss.

20th  St. Louis nudges past Brooklyn 1–0 on brilliant baserunning by Arlie Latham. He opens the game with a single, steals 2B, and scores from 2B on an infield out. Silver King wins the pitchers’ duel from Mickey Hughes.

21st  After making 6 errors in the final 2 innings to blow a 2–0 lead, Detroit loses to Indianapolis 8–3 for its 16th consecutive loss.

22nd  Two one-hitters in the AA today, Jersey Bakely of Cleveland stopping Cincinnati 3–0 and Silver King of St. Louis beating Brooklyn 4–2. King’s bid for a no-hitter ends in the 9th inning when Browns outfielders Tip O’Neill and Harry Lyons allow an easy fly to drop between them.

Baltimore manager Barnie is fined $100 for calling umpire Doescher a “stinker.”

24th  Cap Anson goes 5-for-5, and Jimmy Ryan is 4-for-5 with a HR as the Colts rout the Wolverines 14–4. Anson’s .344 batting average and Ryan’s 16 HRs will be league-leading figures for the season.

25th  New York’s Tim Keefe wins his 30th game of the season, beating the Phillies 7–0. This is the 5th year in succession that Keefe has reached the 30-win mark. Mike Tiernan helps with the first of 2 cycles in his career.

27th Unpopular William Watkins finally resigns as Detroit’s manager and is replaced by Bob Leadley. The Wolverines celebrate by losing to Harry Boyle and the Hoosiers, 6–0.

Tom Brown’s grand slam in the 7th off Mickey Welch provides all the Beaneaters scoring as Boston beats first-place New York, 4–2.

29th  Australian-born Joe Quinn makes his debut with Boston a memorable one by hitting a game-winning HR in the bottom of the 9th to beat the Gotham’s ace Tim Keefe, 2–1.

July 1888

1st With the release of Dave Rowe, Sam Barkley takes the reins as captain-manager of the KC Cowboys (14-36).

2nd During a morning practice game at Recreational Park, Pittsburgh’s captain Fred Dunlap is struck by a hard hit ball and his right jaw is broken. He will be out of action for several weeks.

4th With the Reds trailing 2–0 in the 4th inning of an a.m. game against Brooklyn, John Reilly, Kid Baldwin and Jimmy Peoples delay the game with various stunts. They’ll get fined $25 apiece for their high jinx. They do succeed in holding the game up until the anticipated rain comes in the 5th to wash out the potential defeat. The weather improves in the afternoon and the Reds beat the Grooms, 9–3.

At Chicago, 20,000 fans watch the 2 games with Philadelphia, splitting 10–8 before losing 6–5. President Spalding has 2 ticket speculators arrested outside the grounds of the morning game and had them locked up for violating a law prohibiting the selling of tickets on the street.

Will Hutchison, a college star who has spurned numerous pro offers since leaving Yale in 1881, finally signs, inking a contract with Des Moines (Western Association). He will pitch his team to a pennant this year and later star with Chicago (NL).

5th  The AA meets in St. Louis and refuses to allow its clubs to reduce admission prices from 50 cents to 25 cents. It also adopts a system of double substitute umpires in case the assigned umpire fails to show up for a game, one substitute player from each club sharing the duties.

6th  The Brooklyn AA team, led by former Browns Bob Caruthers, Dave Foutz, and Doc Bushong, makes its first appearance of the series in St. Louis and is feted with a parade to the ballpark. The 3 pace the Bridegrooms to a 6–2 victory over the Browns to take over first place.

7th  The Southern League collapses under financial strain. The New Orleans club will join a truncated Texas League later this month.

Dave Foutz, ex-Brown, drives in the tying and winning runs with 2 outs in the 9th for the Brooklyn Bridegrooms to beat the Browns, 4–3. Foutz is popular in St. Louis and is carried off the field by the Mound City fans.

Kansas City (AA) finishes a 13-9 win over the visiting Baltimore Orioles with a 9th inning triple play. (courtesy SABR Triple Play database).

9th  With slugger Sam Thompson already sidelined with a sore arm, Detroit suffers another crippling injury when Hardie Richardson, Fred Dunlap’s replacement, breaks his ankle and is lost for the season. Detroit beats Washington today, 3–2.

10th Brooklyn scores 3 runs in the bottom of the 9th and 1 in the 10th to beat St. Louis, 5–4, and sweep the 4-game series. Bob Caruthers drives in the winning run and wins his 3rd game of the series.

New York’s Tim Keefe notches his 19th straight victory in beating Pittsburgh, 3–1.

12th The first place Chicago White Stockings play host to last place Washington and provide too much hospitality, losing 22-9. Ed Daily’s second career grand slam in the 6th inning is the big blow for the winners.

Bill Hulbert plays in his last ML game, a 3-1 loss to Kansas City. The veteran Brooklyn catcher has 2335 at bats without a homer.

13th The Pittsburgh Alleghenies shut out Boston 4–0 and 6–0 for the first double header shut out in history.

Cleveland announces the signing of Tom Loftus to replace manager Jimmy Williams, who resigned 3 days ago.

14th  The AA’s substitute umpire system proves a failure after Brooklyn sub Adonis Terry tells his teammates that he heard KC manager Sam Barkley order sub Jim Donahue to call a Bridegroom runner out in the 9th inning of a 5–4 game. The Grooms walk off the field in protest, forfeiting the game, 9–0.

17th  Tommy McCarthy’s 6 stolen bases pace the St. Louis Browns to 15 steals and a 10–3 victory over Kansas City. McCarthy also goes 5-for-5 at the plate.

18th Detroit defeats Chicago, 5–0, and climbs over the Colts into 1st place. Pete Conway twirls a 5-hitter for the Wolverines.

19th Chicago regains 1st place by beating Detroit, 4–3. LF Mark Sullivan saves the game by throwing out Count Campau at home in the bottom of the 9th.

20th  St. Louis regains the AA lead by beating Kansas City 18–5. The Browns will stay in first place the rest of the season.

21st In a game in which the lead changes hands 6 times, the Spiders take the decisive lead with 10 runs in the 8th and beat the Orioles, 17–11.

22nd  The Cleveland club stages its first Sunday game at Beyerle’s Park at Geauga Lake, Ohio, 20 miles southeast of town and just across the county line. A total of 4 Sunday games will be played here this summer.

24th Detroit moves back again into 1st place with a twinbill sweep of Pittsburgh. Pitcher Ed Beatin, subbing in the OF today, is 6-or-8 for Detroit with a HR and 2 triples.

25th  Toad Ramsey misses the Colonels’ getaway train in order to avoid a warrant for his arrest at the railroad station. He is arrested later on the complaint of Louisville saloon owners who charge that Ramsey is overdue paying considerable bar tabs.

26th  Ed Seward of the Athletics pitches a 12–2 no-hitter against the Reds. Seward steals 2 bases and scores 3 times himself. Four Cincy players walk and 4 reach on errors.

27th After having caught 29 consecutive games, Giants backstop Buck Ewing sits out today to nurse a sore ankle. After official figures through July 17 show him leading the NL with 37 stolen, the Buck will stop because of leg and ankle injuries, and he’ll end the year with 53 steals, well behind rookie Dummy Hoy’s total of 82.

28th  Jimmy Ryan hits 2 triples, a single, double and a HR and pitches 7 innings in relief to lead Chicago to a 21–17 slugfest over Detroit, dropping Detroit into a first-place tie with the Giants. The Colts trail by 21⁄2 games. Ryan is the first player to cycle and pitch in the same game. He also takes a turn in the OF and, after hitting a leadoff single in the 1st off of “one of Lady Baldwin’s shoots” (noted in the Chicago Tribune by Dixie Torangeau) he steals 2B and 3B. The Tribune box score notes erroneously that Ryan has 4 hits for the game, but gives him 13 total bases.

Ed Seward follows up his no-hitter with a strong performance, but loses, 2–1, to the Reds in 10 innings. He gives up 7 hits.

Taking advantage of a record-tying 6 errors by Joseph Werrick, Cleveland (AA) defeats Louisville, 12-1.

In Austin, Texas a wild bull chases the Austin outfielders abruptly ending a game.

31st  Gus Weyhing pitches the Athletics’ 2nd no-hitter in 5 games, stopping Kansas City 4–0. He walks one and hits another, but both are thrown out trying to steal.

The New York Giants take over first place by beating Washington 6–1 while Detroit is losing to Indianapolis 7–5 in 11 innings. New York will retain the lead for the remainder of the season.

August 1888

2nd  Claiming illness, Brooklyn captain Dave Orr misses the practice session. But later in the day he is spotted at Coney Island, and owner Charles Byrne removes him as captain.

3rd  Cowboy rookie Billy Hamilton, recently purchased from Worcester, steals his first base in the ML. Before returning to the minors in 1902, Sliding Billy will amass 937 stolen bases, a record till 1979.

5th  The Athletics hold a Sunday game at Gloucester, NJ, across the river from Philadelphia, beating the Cowboys 6–0, behind Ed Seward’s 4-hitter and Denny Lyon’s 2 homers. Gloucester will be the site of 30 AA games through the 1890 season.

7th  At a stormy session in Philadelphia, AA owners finally vote to allow 25-cent admission again but drop the percentage system of paying visitors and replace it with a $130-per-game guarantee.

At Cincinnati, John Reilly lines a 14th inning inside-the-park homer to give the Reds (AA) a 4-3 win over Baltimore.

9th Detroit loses its 9th in a row thanks to a mental error by vet Deacon White. With the potential winning run on 3B in the bottom of the 9th for the Phillies, White fields a ground ball and throws the runner out at 1B, while the winning run crosses the plate uncontested.

10th  Tim Keefe wins his 19th consecutive game to break Hoss Radbourn’s 1884 record. The Giants nip the Alleghenies 2–1 to win their 10th in a row and 18th in 19 games. They now lead by 7 1/2 games.

12th  St. Louis’s Charles “Silver” King posts his 30th win of the season, besting the Athletics with a 2–0 two-hitter. The game is marred by the collapse of an elevated walkway at Sportsman’s Park, but there are no serious injuries.

14th  Tim Keefe’s winning streak is stopped at 19 games when Gus Krock and the Colts beat the Giants 4–2 before a crowd of 10,240 at New York.

15th After convincing Louisville owner Mordecai Davids onto lift his suspension, Colonel lefty Toad Ramsey pitches his first game in 5 weeks. Toad is bombed for 13 runs in less than 2 innings.

17th  Washington rookie SS Shorty Fuller sets a ML record by making 4 errors in one inning, allowing Indianapolis to score 6 runs. Fuller is replaced, and the Senators tie the game 7–7 before new SS George Shoch’s 2 errors in the 8th open the way for 4 runs and an 11–7 loss.

20th  St. Louis nudges past Brooklyn 1–0 on brilliant baserunning by Arlie Latham. He opens the game with a single, steals 2B, and scores from 2B on an infield out. Silver King wins the pitchers’ duel from Mickey Hughes.

21st  After making 6 errors in the final 2 innings to blow a 2–0 lead, Detroit loses to Indianapolis 8–3 for its 16th consecutive loss.

22nd  Two one-hitters in the AA today, Jersey Bakely of Cleveland stopping Cincinnati 3–0 and Silver King of St. Louis beating Brooklyn 4–2. King’s bid for a no-hitter ends in the 9th inning when Browns outfielders Tip O’Neill and Harry Lyons allow an easy fly to drop between them.

Baltimore manager Barnie is fined $100 for calling umpire Doescher a “stinker.”

24th  Cap Anson goes 5-for-5, and Jimmy Ryan is 4-for-5 with a HR as the Colts rout the Wolverines 14–4. Anson’s .344 batting average and Ryan’s 16 HRs will be league-leading figures for the season.

25th  New York’s Tim Keefe wins his 30th game of the season, beating the Phillies 7–0. This is the 5th year in succession that Keefe has reached the 30-win mark. Mike Tiernan helps with the first of 2 cycles in his career.

27th Unpopular William Watkins finally resigns as Detroit’s manager and is replaced by Bob Leadley. The Wolverines celebrate by losing to Harry Boyle and the Hoosiers, 6–0.

Tom Brown’s grand slam in the 7th off Mickey Welch provides all the Beaneaters scoring as Boston beats first-place New York, 4–2.

29th  Australian-born Joe Quinn makes his debut with Boston a memorable one by hitting a game-winning HR in the bottom of the 9th to beat the Gotham’s ace Tim Keefe, 2–1.

July 1888

1st With the release of Dave Rowe, Sam Barkley takes the reins as captain-manager of the KC Cowboys (14-36).

2nd During a morning practice game at Recreational Park, Pittsburgh’s captain Fred Dunlap is struck by a hard hit ball and his right jaw is broken. He will be out of action for several weeks.

4th With the Reds trailing 2–0 in the 4th inning of an a.m. game against Brooklyn, John Reilly, Kid Baldwin and Jimmy Peoples delay the game with various stunts. They’ll get fined $25 apiece for their high jinx. They do succeed in holding the game up until the anticipated rain comes in the 5th to wash out the potential defeat. The weather improves in the afternoon and the Reds beat the Grooms, 9–3.

At Chicago, 20,000 fans watch the 2 games with Philadelphia, splitting 10–8 before losing 6–5. President Spalding has 2 ticket speculators arrested outside the grounds of the morning game and had them locked up for violating a law prohibiting the selling of tickets on the street.

Will Hutchison, a college star who has spurned numerous pro offers since leaving Yale in 1881, finally signs, inking a contract with Des Moines (Western Association). He will pitch his team to a pennant this year and later star with Chicago (NL).

5th  The AA meets in St. Louis and refuses to allow its clubs to reduce admission prices from 50 cents to 25 cents. It also adopts a system of double substitute umpires in case the assigned umpire fails to show up for a game, one substitute player from each club sharing the duties.

6th  The Brooklyn AA team, led by former Browns Bob Caruthers, Dave Foutz, and Doc Bushong, makes its first appearance of the series in St. Louis and is feted with a parade to the ballpark. The 3 pace the Bridegrooms to a 6–2 victory over the Browns to take over first place.

7th  The Southern League collapses under financial strain. The New Orleans club will join a truncated Texas League later this month.

Dave Foutz, ex-Brown, drives in the tying and winning runs with 2 outs in the 9th for the Brooklyn Bridegrooms to beat the Browns, 4–3. Foutz is popular in St. Louis and is carried off the field by the Mound City fans.

Kansas City (AA) finishes a 13-9 win over the visiting Baltimore Orioles with a 9th inning triple play. (courtesy SABR Triple Play database).

9th  With slugger Sam Thompson already sidelined with a sore arm, Detroit suffers another crippling injury when Hardie Richardson, Fred Dunlap’s replacement, breaks his ankle and is lost for the season. Detroit beats Washington today, 3–2.

10th Brooklyn scores 3 runs in the bottom of the 9th and 1 in the 10th to beat St. Louis, 5–4, and sweep the 4-game series. Bob Caruthers drives in the winning run and wins his 3rd game of the series.

New York’s Tim Keefe notches his 19th straight victory in beating Pittsburgh, 3–1.

12th The first place Chicago White Stockings play host to last place Washington and provide too much hospitality, losing 22-9. Ed Daily’s second career grand slam in the 6th inning is the big blow for the winners.

Bill Hulbert plays in his last ML game, a 3-1 loss to Kansas City. The veteran Brooklyn catcher has 2335 at bats without a homer.

13th The Pittsburgh Alleghenies shut out Boston 4–0 and 6–0 for the first double header shut out in history.

Cleveland announces the signing of Tom Loftus to replace manager Jimmy Williams, who resigned 3 days ago.

14th  The AA’s substitute umpire system proves a failure after Brooklyn sub Adonis Terry tells his teammates that he heard KC manager Sam Barkley order sub Jim Donahue to call a Bridegroom runner out in the 9th inning of a 5–4 game. The Grooms walk off the field in protest, forfeiting the game, 9–0.

17th  Tommy McCarthy’s 6 stolen bases pace the St. Louis Browns to 15 steals and a 10–3 victory over Kansas City. McCarthy also goes 5-for-5 at the plate.

18th Detroit defeats Chicago, 5–0, and climbs over the Colts into 1st place. Pete Conway twirls a 5-hitter for the Wolverines.

19th Chicago regains 1st place by beating Detroit, 4–3. LF Mark Sullivan saves the game by throwing out Count Campau at home in the bottom of the 9th.

20th  St. Louis regains the AA lead by beating Kansas City 18–5. The Browns will stay in first place the rest of the season.

21st In a game in which the lead changes hands 6 times, the Spiders take the decisive lead with 10 runs in the 8th and beat the Orioles, 17–11.

22nd  The Cleveland club stages its first Sunday game at Beyerle’s Park at Geauga Lake, Ohio, 20 miles southeast of town and just across the county line. A total of 4 Sunday games will be played here this summer.

24th Detroit moves back again into 1st place with a twinbill sweep of Pittsburgh. Pitcher Ed Beatin, subbing in the OF today, is 6-or-8 for Detroit with a HR and 2 triples.

25th  Toad Ramsey misses the Colonels’ getaway train in order to avoid a warrant for his arrest at the railroad station. He is arrested later on the complaint of Louisville saloon owners who charge that Ramsey is overdue paying considerable bar tabs.

26th  Ed Seward of the Athletics pitches a 12–2 no-hitter against the Reds. Seward steals 2 bases and scores 3 times himself. Four Cincy players walk and 4 reach on errors.

27th After having caught 29 consecutive games, Giants backstop Buck Ewing sits out today to nurse a sore ankle. After official figures through July 17 show him leading the NL with 37 stolen, the Buck will stop because of leg and ankle injuries, and he’ll end the year with 53 steals, well behind rookie Dummy Hoy’s total of 82.

28th  Jimmy Ryan hits 2 triples, a single, double and a HR and pitches 7 innings in relief to lead Chicago to a 21–17 slugfest over Detroit, dropping Detroit into a first-place tie with the Giants. The Colts trail by 21⁄2 games. Ryan is the first player to cycle and pitch in the same game. He also takes a turn in the OF and, after hitting a leadoff single in the 1st off of “one of Lady Baldwin’s shoots” (noted in the Chicago Tribune by Dixie Torangeau) he steals 2B and 3B. The Tribune box score notes erroneously that Ryan has 4 hits for the game, but gives him 13 total bases.

Ed Seward follows up his no-hitter with a strong performance, but loses, 2–1, to the Reds in 10 innings. He gives up 7 hits.

Taking advantage of a record-tying 6 errors by Joseph Werrick, Cleveland (AA) defeats Louisville, 12-1.

In Austin, Texas a wild bull chases the Austin outfielders abruptly ending a game.

31st  Gus Weyhing pitches the Athletics’ 2nd no-hitter in 5 games, stopping Kansas City 4–0. He walks one and hits another, but both are thrown out trying to steal.

The New York Giants take over first place by beating Washington 6–1 while Detroit is losing to Indianapolis 7–5 in 11 innings. New York will retain the lead for the remainder of the season.

June 1888

1st In a dandy matchup in the American Association, two unbeaten young pitchers face each other in Brooklyn. Both Leon Viau of Cleveland and Mickey Hughes of Brooklyn are unbeaten since the start of the season, but Hughes wins the duel today, 3–1. It won’t last long: Hughes will lose his next game on June 3, 6–4 to St. Louis.

2nd Kansas City caps a comeback from a 12–3 deficit by scoring 7 runs in the bottom of the 9th to beat Cleveland, 16–15. The victory lifts the Cowboys into 7th place ahead of the Louisville Colonels.

3rd The poem “Casey at the Bat” by Ernest Thayer is published in the San Francisco Examiner. Not until August 15, when actor Dewitt Hopper recites the poem with the New York Giants and Chicago White Stockings in the audience, will it become popular. When Hopper dies in 1935, it is estimated he recited the poem 10,000 times.

5th Jimmy Ryan makes a rare start for Chicago and edges Philadelphia, 3–2, thanks in part to 4 errors by the Phils’ Ed Delahanty. The Philadelphia Bulletin (as noted by Dixie Torangeau) reports that Delahanty makes 5 errors and gets hurt late in the game and is replaced by Bastian.

6th  Henry Porter of the Kansas City Cowboys (AA) pitches a no-hitter against Baltimore, walking one and winning 4–0.

Cleveland and Louisville (AA) combine for 50 hits as Cleveland outscores the Colonels 23–19. Louisville pitcher Guy Hecker neglects his pitching but not his hitting as he goes 5-for-6, including 3 doubles, and scores 3 times. It is the second time he has had 5 hits in a game.

7th Clarence Duval, a juvenile black actor appearing in the production “Starlight” has been adopted by the White Stockings as a mascot and will travel with the team.

8th  New Louisville owner Mordecai Davidson accepts manager John Kelly’s resignation and announces he will manage the club himself.

In the longest game in the NL this year, Detroit beats John Clarkson and Boston 11–5 in 16 innings.

In New York, the Chicago team makes quite a show when, before the game, they emerge from their carriages, form a line, and march onto the field in their swallow-coats, led by their young mascot twirling a baton. The Giants are not impressed and trounce Van Haltren, 19–2.

9th  In New York, the Giants make fun of yesterday’s Chicago entrance by marching onto the Polo Grounds wearing white plug hats and swallow-tail linen dusters. Jack Lynch, the old Mets pitcher, walks in the lead with a bat as a baton. Thirteen thousand fans are delighted. Chicago scores 4 times in the 1st and finishes with an 8–3 win.

The resurgent Wolverines hold off the Beaneaters 10–9 to post their 7th consecutive victory and move to within 2 games of first place.

Henry Porter follows up his no-hitter with a 12–4 loss to Louisville. He gives up 17 hits.

10th  The Athletics play their first official Sunday home game at Gloucester, NJ, or so they think. The AA secretary will later rule the game illegally rescheduled and throw it out of official records.

12th  OF Jimmy Ryan, who homered in the first inning, is brought in to pitch with the bases loaded in the 2nd inning. He shuts out the Giants as the Colts rally to win 4–2 to up their NL lead to 4 games.

13th  The last-place Senators finally get a legitimate manager when veteran Ted Sullivan arrives.

14th  St. Louis (AA) hurlers Nat Hudson and Tom McCarthy provide the offense as both pitchers hit homers off Toad Ramsey in a 13-7 win over Louisville.

Reds pitching star Tony Mullane suffers a broken nose when hit by a drive in Kansas City. The injury will keep him out of action for 10 days, but his famous good looks will not be permanently damaged.

15th Jim McTamany of Kansas City (AA) collects 6 hits—5 singles and a home run—off Elmer Smith and John Corkhill of Cincinnati.

16th The NY Giants trade Elmer Cleveland to Detroit for holdout 3B Art Whitney.

18th  Two AA umpires work the Cleveland-Athletic game, a 3–2 Philadelphia win. The 2-umpire system had worked well in last fall’s WS, but this is believed to be a regular-season first.

19th A 2-out, 9th inning collision between Washington fielders Walt Wilmot and George Shoch allows Philadelphia to score the winning run. It gives manager Sullivan his first loss after 4 wins.

20th  Future Hall of Famer 1B Jake Beckley makes his ML debut with Pittsburgh, with a double, triple, and stolen base. Beckley started the season with the St. Louis Whites.

21st  George Van Haltren pitches a 6-inning no-hitter beating Pittsburgh for Chicago 1–0. He also pitches a hitless 7th, but since the Colts cannot complete their half before the rain, the official score reverts to 6 innings.

22nd  In Chicago, the Colts overcome a 6–1 deficit by scoring 11 runs in the 6th inning to beat Pittsburgh 12–6. Fred Pfeffer drives home 4 runs in the 6th with a single and an inside-the-park homer.

Bierbauer of the Athletics establishes the record for second basemen by making 12 putouts in a 9-inning game. This record will not be tied until August 30th, 1966. Oddly, Bierbauer has no assists and 2 errors in today’s game, a 6–5 win over Baltimore.

25th   Jumbo Davis of Kansas City makes 5 errors at 3B as the Cowboys fall to the Browns 10–3. He will finish the season with 91 miscues at third base, the 2nd highest total in history behind the 107 that Bill Joyce will commit in 1890. Jumbo will add another 9 at shortstop, for an even 100 errors.

26th Hercules Bennett strikes out in all 4 of his official at bats in his debut with Louisville. Although he walks, steals a base, and cores a run to help the Colonels beat the Bridegrooms, he will not play another ML game until 1895.

29th The Beaneaters release vets Ezra Sutton and Jack Burdock. Both players have been in the NL since its start in 1876 and had been with Boston for a decade.

30th  With permission from the NL, the Phillies reduce admission to 25 cents. Twelve thousand fans turn out to see a one-hit 7–0 victory over Boston by Charlie Buffinton. After averaging 1,123 admissions at the 50-cent rate, attendance will now jump to an average of 4,010.

May 1888

1st  After holding out for a $4,000 salary, Tim Keefe wins his 1888 debut for the Giants, beating Boston 6–1.

3rd  In New York, George Gore goes to LF to start the game, but box-seat holders scream for Mike Slattery, and captain Buck Ewing makes the change before the game starts. It turns out wrong as the Gothams lose to Boston, 6–2.

Light-hitting George Shoch hits a grand slam in the 5th inning, off Kid Gleason, to provide the margin of victory as Washington edges host Philadelphia, 9-8.

5th  Gid Gardner plays for the Phillies after being traded from Washington for Cupid Childs. But when Childs refuses to play for the Senators, the trade and today’s game are nullified. Childs will end up in Kalamazoo for his recalcitrance.

6th  Long John Reilly hits 2 HRs, giving him 4 in Cincinnati’s 4-game series versus Kansas City. Reilly will finish the season with an AA-leading 13 HRs.

9th  Playing in the close quarters of Indianapolis’s Athletic Park, Roger Connor hits 3 HRs and the Giants total 7 (Gore, Keefe, H. Richardson, and Tiernan) to tie the existing records. Connecting for Indianapolis is Roger Denny: When Detroit belted 7 homers against St. Louis in 1886, Denny also homered for the losers. The Giants win, 18–4.

With an 18–6 lead after 7 innings, Louisville righthander Elton “Ice Box” Chamberlin (AKA Chamberlain) pitches the final 2 innings lefthanded, holding Kansas City scoreless. Chamberlin will reprise his righty-lefty pitching in a game on October 1, 1891 (as noted by Cliff Blau).

12th St. Louis RF Tommy McCarthy shows his savvy by sneaking behind a runner who had just singled and picking him off 1B on a throw from 2B. The Browns beat the Cowboys, 4–3.

15th The Athletics whip visiting Baltimore, 12-3, as Harry Stovey hits for the cycle (as noted in Total Baseball).

18th George Borchers pitches a 5-inning shutout in his ML debut, winning for Chicago, 13–0, over Boston, to up the Colts lead to 3 games.

19th  During Chicago’s 6–4 win over the Phillies, 2B Fred Pfeffer goes from 1B to 2B on a fly to LF. According to the Chicago Tribune, “Pfeffer has introduced a new slide. He throws his body away from the base-line and reaches one foot for the bag.” After a catch, George Wood, Phils LF, makes a perfect throw to Arthur Irwin, who is surprised to find Pfeffer’s foot on the bag.

Senator owner Robert C. Hewitt recalls acting manager Burkett to Washington after the team loses its 7th straight on the road. Jim Whitney and the owner’s son are left in charge.

20th The Athletics try and stage a Sunday game across the river in Gloucester, NJ, but the inadequate stands and field are overrun by a mob of spectators, and the game is called off.

22nd  Future Hall of Fame slugger Ed Delahanty makes his ML debut with the Phillies, going hitless and making 2 errors at 2B. His contract had been purchased from Wheeling in the Tri-State League for $2,000.

25th  Boston opens its new Grand Pavilion, an elaborate double-decked structure. Though the Pavilion seats 2,800, 12,000 see the Beaneaters lose their home opener to the Phillies 4–1.

26th With flawless fielding and 3 hits, Hardie Richardson of Detroit stars in a 9–8 win over Chicago. His last hit is a game-winning HR in the 9th.

27th  Bill “Adonis” Terry hurls his 2nd career no-hitter, beating Kansas City 4–0. Three men walk and 2 more reach on errors. Terry no-hit St. Louis on July 24, 1886.

30th  The Brooklyn Bridegrooms, so called because many players married over the winter, move into first place by winning 2 games from previous leader Cincinnati. The visiting Reds lose 4–3 and 10–6.

April 1888

1st  The Texas League plays its first game, Houston winning at home 3–1 over Galveston before 3,000 fans.

2nd  The Browns beat Detroit 5–3 in New Orleans in the first game of a World Series rematch from last fall. The games are advertised locally as a “World Championship Series.”

3rd  Chicago sells pitching star John Clarkson to Boston for $10,000. He has said he doesn’t ant to play for Chicago but would rather play near his Boston home. With last year’s deal for catcher King Kelly, the Beaneaters have acquired a “$20,000 Battery” from the White Stockings.

7th The Washington Evening Star writes about Dummy Hoy, “When he bats a man stands in the Captain’s box near third base and signals to him decisions of the umpire on balls and strikes by raising his fingers.” Many years later, Hoy comments in The Silent Worker of April 1952, that “the coacher at third kept me posted by lifting his right hand for strikes and his left for balls. This gave later day umpires an idea and they now raise their right … to emphasize an indisputable strike.” (as noted by Bob Schaefer)

9th Matt Kilroy signs with Baltimore in the morning and then hustles back to Philadelphia to marry Fanny Denny in the evening. The honeymoon will be spent training with the Orioles.

10th Denny Mack dies after a fall down a stairs. Mack started with the Rockford team in 1871 and played for many NL teams, For the past 2 seasons he managed Wilkes-Barre.

13th Pittsburgh shuts out Boston twice, winning 4-0 and 6-0. Harry Staley and Pud Galvin apply the whitewash.

14th The Kansas City Cowboys (AA) beat the KC Blues (WA), 6–5, in 10 innings to clinch the best of 3 series and the local bragging rights. The 2 clubs will compete fiercely for support during the season.

16th  As reported in tomorrow’s edition of the Washington Post, Jacob Murphy; the temperance apostle, held a meeting at the Louisville baseball park this morning. Every member of the Louisville Club signed the pledge. Pete Browning was the first to put on the blue ribbon and was followed by Tommy Ramsey. The Louisvilles will now be known as the Blue Ribbon Club. (as noted by Clifford Otto).

18th  At Opening Day in the AA, umpire John Gaffney makes news by standing behind the pitcher with men on base, an innovation that will soon be adopted by all single umpires.

20th Opening Day in the NL. The inauguration of the new grandstand in Indianapolis is overshadowed by fights on the field involving Paul Hines and Dude Esterbrook of the Hoosiers and Dell Darling and Marty Sullivan of the Chicago Colts. Chicago wins, 5–4, with Terry Larkin beating Only Nolan.

23rd  The Athletics pile up 28 runs on 23 hits, 5 walks, and 13 Cleveland errors in making the largest score of the season.

The St. Louis Browns Tommy McCarthy performs a 1st in ML history when he reaches 1B on single, steals 2B and 3B. Then with 2 out and with 2 strikes on batter Silver King, he swipes home to win the game, 3–2.

27th  Detroit manager Bill Watkins fines captain Ned Hanlon $10 and suspends P Lady Baldwin without pay after Baldwin and the Wolverines are routed in Indianapolis 16–7, dropping the Wolverines’ record to 1-5.

28th The champion Wolverines rebound by beating the Hoosiers, 1–0, on Charlie Getzien’s 4-hitter and Sam Thompson’s HR.

29th  Phillie star Charlie Ferguson, 25, a 20-game winner in each of his first four seasons, dies of typhoid pneumonia at the home of Arthur Irwin. As a general ballplayer he had few equals.

30th Boston runs its record to 9-0 as Clarkson wins his 5th game. Batterymate Kelly scores 3 times including the game winner in the 10th of the 4–3 win.

March 1888

1st  The Washington NL club leaves on its southern tour a day earlier than scheduled, due to a superstition against starting a trip on a Friday.

2nd  The NL meets in New York and abolishes all discounts from the 50-cent minimum admission price. Despite the demands of the Brotherhood and the fact that the rule is practically a dead letter, the NL refuses to drop its $2,000 salary limit rule. The schedule committee recommends that the season go to 140 games from the current 126.

5th The AA meets in Brooklyn and votes to make use of turnstiles mandatory at all entrances to its parks.

20th  Albert Spalding announces a baseball tour to Australia next winter with his Chicago team and a squad of NL all-stars.

22nd Deacon White signs with Detroit after a prolonged battle with manager William Watkins, under whom White had said he’d never play.

25th  The St. Louis Browns open the training season with an exhibition game versus the St. Louis Whites, a new Western Association team. The WA will have clubs in 4 cities that also have NL clubs.

Feburary 1888

2nd  Indianapolis announces that the roof of its new grandstand will hold 42 private boxes, to be sold to season subscribers only.

23rd James “Pud” Galvin signs with Pittsburgh for $3,000, including $1,000 in advance. The club offered him $3,500 with no advance money, but Galvin needs the $1,000 to tide him over the winter.

29th In a spring training game in New Orleans, Cincinnati C Kid Baldwin slugs the umpire during an argument and narrowly escapes arrest.

January 1888

2nd  Fred Dunlap finally signs with Pittsburgh following the sale of his contract by Detroit. He agrees to a $5,000 salary and a $2,000 bonus, making him the highest-paid player to date.

15th The Texas League is organized when the following six cities are awarded franchises: Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth, Galveston, Houston, and San Antonio.

In San Francisco, George Van Haltran, pitching for the Giants, tosses a no-hitter against the St. Louis Browns in an exhibition game. The only solidly hit ball is a Tip O’Neill line drive caught by 1B Buck Ewing.

17th  Kansas City is admitted to the American Association to replace the Mets. Even though the Mets were bought out by Brooklyn, their franchise is only considered suspended until suitable playing facilities in Manhattan can be found.

23rd  Harry Spence is hired to manage the Indianapolis (NL) team.

27th  Brooklyn keeps 5 of the recently purchased Mets players and sells the rest of the squad and 4 Brooklyn players to Kansas City for $7,000.

28th In Chicago’s Lincoln Park, 350 fans brave the weather to watch a baseball game on ice at Lincoln Park. Fred Pfeffer, the only player who lives off-season in Chicago, plays wearing a top hat. After 2 hours and 5 innings of play, the game is called. The Spaldings defeat the North-Siders, 7–6.

December 1887

2nd  The International League disbands. Syracuse, Toronto, Hamilton, and Buffalo split off to form the International Association, while Newark, Jersey City, Wilkes-Barre, and Scranton become the nucleus of the Central League.

7th  The Arbitration Committee meets and grants reserve rights to minor league clubs for the first time. In the most prominent contract dispute, prospect Bug Hilliday signs with minor league Des Moines, despite the claims by ML St. Louis.

8th  In a controversial move the AA doubles its basic admission price to 50 cents. In late August 1888, the league, suffering from decreases in attendance and revenues, reinstitutes the old admission fee.

12th  A baseball reporters association is organized. It pledges to work to standardize scoring practices, especially in the gray area of stolen bases.

13th  Von der Ahe completes his biggest deal selling Bob Caruthers to Brooklyn for $8,250. The deal was delayed by Caruthers’s negotiations with Brooklyn, but he finally agrees to $5,000 for 1888.

15th The Texas League is organized at a meeting in Austin, thanks largely to the efforts of John J. McCloskey.

November 1887

1st  Following a 3-game sweep at the hands of the Detroits, Boston removes King Kelly as captain and gives the job back to manager-1B John Morrill. It works as they beat the visiting Indianapolis squad, 9-3.

3rd  The Browns win a doubleheader on Staten Island to run their latest winning streak to 12 games and extend their lead in the AA race to 191⁄2 games. New York falls, 20–8 and 7–4.

4th The Mets and Browns try and stage a Sunday game at Monitor Park in Weehawken, NJ. But the field is in bad shape and the crowd is much too large for the facilities, so only an exhibition game is played. St. Louis CF Curt Welch is knocked out of action for a week when he is hit in the head with a bat that slips out of the hands of teammate Tip O’Neill.

5th  Chicago wins the opening game of their final series against league-leading Detroit 11–7. John Clarkson picks up his 9th victory over the Wolverines, the most ever by a pitcher over a pennant-winning team.

In New York, the Browns (AA) lose to the Metropolitans, 6-5. St. Louis star Tip O’Neill connects for an extra base hit in his 12th straight game: 14 doubles, 3 triples, 2 homers. According to historian Trent McCotter, this includes 12 straight games where he scored a run, had an RBI, and had an extra base hit. Bobby Abreau, in 2005, will do the same in 10 straight games. O’Neill consecutive extra-base hit skein will be topped in 1927 by Paul Waner (14 games).

7th  Detroit gets sweet revenge against Clarkson and the White Stockings, beating them twice, 8–2 and 8–4, while amassing 34 hits. The defeat pushes the 2nd-place Chicagos 7 games behind.

Billy Otterson hits a 4th inning grand slam, off Mike Morrison, as Brooklyn spanks Cleveland, 16-3 (as noted by David Vincent).

11th  The Mets successfully stage a Sunday “home” game in Weehawken, NJ, losing to the Colonels 10–6.

The St. Louis Browns players refuse to play an exhibition game versus the all-black Cuban Giants team, stating in a letter to the owner that “we will cheerfully play against white people at any time and think that by refusing to play [blacks] we are only doing what is right.” Arlie Latham is singled out as the leader of the recalcitrant players and is fined.

13th  Jimmy Ryan goes 6-for-6 for Chicago with a single, double, HR, and 3 walks. He also pitches the final 5 innings in relief of Lady Baldwin to get the win. The White Stockings rally to beat the Phillies, 16–13, overcoming 13 errors committed.

14th  Chicago whips the visiting Phillies, 17–12, for their 3rd win in a row over the Philadelphians. The Phils will not lose for the rest of the season. Adrian “Cap” Anson is 3-for-5, giving him 17 hits in the last 5 games. His hot streak will win him the NL batting title with an official .421 average (without walks, which are counted as hits, Sam Thompson would have won the title with a .372 mark).

15th For the 2nd day in a row, the Reds play a morning game in Staten Island, NY, against the Mets and an afternoon game in Brooklyn. The Mets play Cleveland in the p.m. game, losing both games. The Reds Tony Mullane pitches his 5th shutout of the year, winning 4–0, against the Mets to tie the ML season record of a pitcher against one team (Lady Baldwin, 1886). The Reds (AA) beat Brooklyn, 11–1, in the p.m. game.

18th Doc Bushong catches for the Browns for the first time since suffering a broken finger on July 1. But he’ll never regain the form that made him the best defensive catcher in the AA. The Browns win, 6-4 over visiting Cleveland.

22nd  Elmer Smith of Cincinnati shuts out St. Louis 6–0. The Browns will be blanked in only 2 regular season games, both times by Smith.

28th  Abner Dalrymple hits 2 dramatic HRs in front of his old fans in Chicago, one to tie the game for Pittsburgh in the 8th inning and one to win it 3–2 in the 10th. These are Dalrymple’s only HRs of the season.

30th  Connie Mack singles, steals 2B, and scores on John Irwin’s first NL hit to give Washington a 1–0 victory over New York. Jim Whitney and Tim O’Keefe each strike out 10.

OCTOBER

1st  Matt Kilroy pitches and wins both games of a doubleheader to close the home season at Oriole Park. This duplicates a feat of July 26th. The fastballer finishes the season with a 46-20 record, the ML-season record for a lefthander.

5th  Washington’s Pat Dealy hits his only homer of the year, a grand slam, to beat his old team, Boston, 12-9. It comes in the 5th inning against Kid Madden.

7th  In an attempt to play off a tie, the Giants and Phils end in another tie at 5-5. The Phils score in the top of the 10th but the game is called on account of darkness.

8th  The Metropolitan franchise and player contracts are sold to AA rival Brooklyn for $15,000. Purchaser Charles Byrne has the Mets play today’s game in Brooklyn’s Washington Park, where the hapless Indians lose to the Orioles 10–0.

The Phillies finish the NL season with a 6–3 win over New York before 4500 at the Polo Grounds. The late spurt jumps them to 2nd place behind Detroit. The winner is Charlie Ferguson (22-10), who finishes his 4th 20-game season in a row. He has won 8 in a row to end the season. Ferguson, who also plays 2B, when not pitching, hits a team-high 337, and drives in 85 runs in just 264 at-bats. His teammate James Fogerty ends with league-high 82 walks and 102 stolen bases in just 126 games.

Tip O’Neill hits his 14th homer of the season as part of a 5-for-5 day in the Browns’ 11–5 win over Louisville. O’Neill is the only player in ML history to lead his AA league in all 3 categories of extra base hits: homers (14), triples (19), and doubles (52). Even without counting walks, his .435 adjusted average is 2nd on the all-time list.

Washington announces that Walter Harris will manage the team next year. Harris is a surprise pick.

9th  With a 6-2 win over Cleveland, the St. Louis Browns end their AA season with a 95-40 record, besting their 1886 record by 2 wins. This will not be topped until the adoption of the 154-game schedule.

Louisville batting and pitching star Guy Hecker sets a fielding record while playing 1B. He is the first player at the position to play a 9-inning game with no fielding chances. Cincinnati (AA) tops Louisville, 2–0.

10th  The best-of-15 game World Series opens in St. Louis with the Browns (AA) facing the Detroit Wolverines. The two teams agree to play all 15 games in 10 different cities with the champion being the first team to win 8 games. The teams will play three games in St. Louis, two in Detroit, two in Brooklyn, two in Philadelphia and one each in Pittsburgh, New York, Boston, Baltimore and Chicago. The Browns take the opener, 6–1, as P Bob Caruthers holds the Wolverines to 5 hits and has 3 safe hits himself.

11th Fumbling by the Browns gives the Wolverines 5 unearned runs and a 5–3 win in game 2.

12th  Game 3 is the most dramatic of the series, Detroit winning at home 2–1 in 13 innings. St. Louis squanders 13 hits against Charlie Getzien, while Caruthers limits Detroit to 6 real hits.

13th  The best-of-15 WS begins its tour of the other cities with a game in Pittsburgh, Detroit winning 8–0 behind the 2-hit pitching of Lady Baldwin.

15th After the Browns won yesterday in Brooklyn, 5–2, Detroit bounces back in New York today with a 9–0 win. Charlie Getzien takes a no-hitter (not counting walks) into the 9th inning but settles for a 3-hit game. Charlie Ganzel, playing 1B in place of the injured Dan Brouthers, leads with 4 hits. Brouthers is out for the series with a sprained ankle.
18th Boston’s Dartmouth Street Grounds ballpark, last used by the Union Association Reds of 1884, is the neutral site of a World Series game between Detroit and St. Louis. This is the last game in the park (as noted by historian John Thorn), which will be demolished. Sam Thompson does a bit of demolishing today, hitting two homers as the Wolverines win, 9-2, over the Browns.

19th  Detroit runs its lead in the WS to 7 games to 2 with a 4–2 victory at the Athletics’ Park. This follows a 3–1 win at the Phillies’ Park on the 17th and a 9–2 rout yesterday in Boston.

21st  Detroit clinches the World Championship with its 8th victory in game 11 this afternoon in Baltimore 13–3. With a rainout yesterday, this morning’s rescheduled game in Washington sees the Browns pull off a triple play in the 3rd and win, 11–4, to delay elimination. In the bottom of the sixth, Arlie Latham hits a solo inside-the-park homer to make it 6-3. The homer is scored as a triple and error by pitcher Charlie Getzien who botches the throw at home as Latham slides in. It is then changed to a four bagger.

26th  The World Series winds up with a game back at Sportsman’s Park in St. Louis. St. Louis wins the final game but loses the series, 10 games to 5. Sam Thompson leads all hitters in the series with a .362 average.

27th  The Brotherhood of Professional Base Ball Players holds a meeting and club representatives pledge not to sign standard contracts until negotiations are held concerning the wording of those documents.

29th  Ned Williamson and Silver Flint sign with Chicago for 1888 despite the Brotherhood pledge.

NOVEMBER

2nd  The Athletics are sold to a syndicate headed by Henry C. Pennypacker. The 3 long time partners, Sharsig, Simmons, and Mason, still hold a sizable block of stock.

3rd  The directors of the Omaha club agree to pay $3,000 per month to manager Frank Selee to bring his team from Oshkosh, where they won the Northwestern League pennant in 1887. Two top stars, outfielders Tommy McCarthy and Dummy Hoy, will spend 1888 in the ML, however, and Selee’s Omaha team will finish 4th in the WA race.

4th Washington sells veteran Paul Hines to Indianapolis for $5,000.

14th  Cleveland announces a new uniform design featuring dark blue stripes and piping. The new suit will inspire the nickname “Spider” because of the web-like pattern.

16th  The Joint Rules Committee does away with the 4-strike rule and with the scoring of walks as hits. Five balls for a walk remains the rule.

17th  The NL meets and officially recognizes the Brotherhood by meeting with a committee of 3 players, John Ward, Ned Hanlon, and Dan Brouthers.

18th  The NL adopts a new contract that spells out reserve provisions for the first time. The NL refuses to accept the players’ demand that the salary be written out on all contracts, however.

21st  The St. Louis Browns announce a trade with the Athletics that ships Bill Gleason and Curt Welch to Philadelphia for Fred Mann, Chippy McGarr, and Jocko Milligan, plus $3,000. This is multi-player trade in history and the first of a number of trades or sales, mostly to Brooklyn.

October 1887

1st  Following a 3-game sweep at the hands of the Detroits, Boston removes King Kelly as captain and gives the job back to manager-1B John Morrill. It works as they beat the visiting Indianapolis squad, 9-3.

3rd  The Browns win a doubleheader on Staten Island to run their latest winning streak to 12 games and extend their lead in the AA race to 191⁄2 games. New York falls, 20–8 and 7–4.

4th The Mets and Browns try and stage a Sunday game at Monitor Park in Weehawken, NJ. But the field is in bad shape and the crowd is much too large for the facilities, so only an exhibition game is played. St. Louis CF Curt Welch is knocked out of action for a week when he is hit in the head with a bat that slips out of the hands of teammate Tip O’Neill.

5th  Chicago wins the opening game of their final series against league-leading Detroit 11–7. John Clarkson picks up his 9th victory over the Wolverines, the most ever by a pitcher over a pennant-winning team.

In New York, the Browns (AA) lose to the Metropolitans, 6-5. St. Louis star Tip O’Neill connects for an extra base hit in his 12th straight game: 14 doubles, 3 triples, 2 homers. According to historian Trent McCotter, this includes 12 straight games where he scored a run, had an RBI, and had an extra base hit. Bobby Abreau, in 2005, will do the same in 10 straight games. O’Neill consecutive extra-base hit skein will be topped in 1927 by Paul Waner (14 games).

7th  Detroit gets sweet revenge against Clarkson and the White Stockings, beating them twice, 8–2 and 8–4, while amassing 34 hits. The defeat pushes the 2nd-place Chicagos 7 games behind.

Billy Otterson hits a 4th inning grand slam, off Mike Morrison, as Brooklyn spanks Cleveland, 16-3 (as noted by David Vincent).

11th  The Mets successfully stage a Sunday “home” game in Weehawken, NJ, losing to the Colonels 10–6.

The St. Louis Browns players refuse to play an exhibition game versus the all-black Cuban Giants team, stating in a letter to the owner that “we will cheerfully play against white people at any time and think that by refusing to play [blacks] we are only doing what is right.” Arlie Latham is singled out as the leader of the recalcitrant players and is fined.

13th  Jimmy Ryan goes 6-for-6 for Chicago with a single, double, HR, and 3 walks. He also pitches the final 5 innings in relief of Lady Baldwin to get the win. The White Stockings rally to beat the Phillies, 16–13, overcoming 13 errors committed.

14th  Chicago whips the visiting Phillies, 17–12, for their 3rd win in a row over the Philadelphians. The Phils will not lose for the rest of the season. Adrian “Cap” Anson is 3-for-5, giving him 17 hits in the last 5 games. His hot streak will win him the NL batting title with an official .421 average (without walks, which are counted as hits, Sam Thompson would have won the title with a .372 mark).

15th For the 2nd day in a row, the Reds play a morning game in Staten Island, NY, against the Mets and an afternoon game in Brooklyn. The Mets play Cleveland in the p.m. game, losing both games. The Reds Tony Mullane pitches his 5th shutout of the year, winning 4–0, against the Mets to tie the ML season record of a pitcher against one team (Lady Baldwin, 1886). The Reds (AA) beat Brooklyn, 11–1, in the p.m. game.

18th Doc Bushong catches for the Browns for the first time since suffering a broken finger on July 1. But he’ll never regain the form that made him the best defensive catcher in the AA. The Browns win, 6-4 over visiting Cleveland.

22nd  Elmer Smith of Cincinnati shuts out St. Louis 6–0. The Browns will be blanked in only 2 regular season games, both times by Smith.

28th  Abner Dalrymple hits 2 dramatic HRs in front of his old fans in Chicago, one to tie the game for Pittsburgh in the 8th inning and one to win it 3–2 in the 10th. These are Dalrymple’s only HRs of the season.

30th  Connie Mack singles, steals 2B, and scores on John Irwin’s first NL hit to give Washington a 1–0 victory over New York. Jim Whitney and Tim O’Keefe each strike out 10.

OCTOBER

1st  Matt Kilroy pitches and wins both games of a doubleheader to close the home season at Oriole Park. This duplicates a feat of July 26th. The fastballer finishes the season with a 46-20 record, the ML-season record for a lefthander.

5th  Washington’s Pat Dealy hits his only homer of the year, a grand slam, to beat his old team, Boston, 12-9. It comes in the 5th inning against Kid Madden.

7th  In an attempt to play off a tie, the Giants and Phils end in another tie at 5-5. The Phils score in the top of the 10th but the game is called on account of darkness.

8th  The Metropolitan franchise and player contracts are sold to AA rival Brooklyn for $15,000. Purchaser Charles Byrne has the Mets play today’s game in Brooklyn’s Washington Park, where the hapless Indians lose to the Orioles 10–0.

The Phillies finish the NL season with a 6–3 win over New York before 4500 at the Polo Grounds. The late spurt jumps them to 2nd place behind Detroit. The winner is Charlie Ferguson (22-10), who finishes his 4th 20-game season in a row. He has won 8 in a row to end the season. Ferguson, who also plays 2B, when not pitching, hits a team-high 337, and drives in 85 runs in just 264 at-bats. His teammate James Fogerty ends with league-high 82 walks and 102 stolen bases in just 126 games.

Tip O’Neill hits his 14th homer of the season as part of a 5-for-5 day in the Browns’ 11–5 win over Louisville. O’Neill is the only player in ML history to lead his AA league in all 3 categories of extra base hits: homers (14), triples (19), and doubles (52). Even without counting walks, his .435 adjusted average is 2nd on the all-time list.

Washington announces that Walter Harris will manage the team next year. Harris is a surprise pick.

9th  With a 6-2 win over Cleveland, the St. Louis Browns end their AA season with a 95-40 record, besting their 1886 record by 2 wins. This will not be topped until the adoption of the 154-game schedule.

Louisville batting and pitching star Guy Hecker sets a fielding record while playing 1B. He is the first player at the position to play a 9-inning game with no fielding chances. Cincinnati (AA) tops Louisville, 2–0.

10th  The best-of-15 game World Series opens in St. Louis with the Browns (AA) facing the Detroit Wolverines. The two teams agree to play all 15 games in 10 different cities with the champion being the first team to win 8 games. The teams will play three games in St. Louis, two in Detroit, two in Brooklyn, two in Philadelphia and one each in Pittsburgh, New York, Boston, Baltimore and Chicago. The Browns take the opener, 6–1, as P Bob Caruthers holds the Wolverines to 5 hits and has 3 safe hits himself.

11th Fumbling by the Browns gives the Wolverines 5 unearned runs and a 5–3 win in game 2.

12th  Game 3 is the most dramatic of the series, Detroit winning at home 2–1 in 13 innings. St. Louis squanders 13 hits against Charlie Getzien, while Caruthers limits Detroit to 6 real hits.

13th  The best-of-15 WS begins its tour of the other cities with a game in Pittsburgh, Detroit winning 8–0 behind the 2-hit pitching of Lady Baldwin.

15th After the Browns won yesterday in Brooklyn, 5–2, Detroit bounces back in New York today with a 9–0 win. Charlie Getzien takes a no-hitter (not counting walks) into the 9th inning but settles for a 3-hit game. Charlie Ganzel, playing 1B in place of the injured Dan Brouthers, leads with 4 hits. Brouthers is out for the series with a sprained ankle.
18th Boston’s Dartmouth Street Grounds ballpark, last used by the Union Association Reds of 1884, is the neutral site of a World Series game between Detroit and St. Louis. This is the last game in the park (as noted by historian John Thorn), which will be demolished. Sam Thompson does a bit of demolishing today, hitting two homers as the Wolverines win, 9-2, over the Browns.

19th  Detroit runs its lead in the WS to 7 games to 2 with a 4–2 victory at the Athletics’ Park. This follows a 3–1 win at the Phillies’ Park on the 17th and a 9–2 rout yesterday in Boston.

21st  Detroit clinches the World Championship with its 8th victory in game 11 this afternoon in Baltimore 13–3. With a rainout yesterday, this morning’s rescheduled game in Washington sees the Browns pull off a triple play in the 3rd and win, 11–4, to delay elimination. In the bottom of the sixth, Arlie Latham hits a solo inside-the-park homer to make it 6-3. The homer is scored as a triple and error by pitcher Charlie Getzien who botches the throw at home as Latham slides in. It is then changed to a four bagger.

26th  The World Series winds up with a game back at Sportsman’s Park in St. Louis. St. Louis wins the final game but loses the series, 10 games to 5. Sam Thompson leads all hitters in the series with a .362 average.

27th  The Brotherhood of Professional Base Ball Players holds a meeting and club representatives pledge not to sign standard contracts until negotiations are held concerning the wording of those documents.

29th  Ned Williamson and Silver Flint sign with Chicago for 1888 despite the Brotherhood pledge.

September 1887

1st  Following a 3-game sweep at the hands of the Detroits, Boston removes King Kelly as captain and gives the job back to manager-1B John Morrill. It works as they beat the visiting Indianapolis squad, 9-3.

3rd  The Browns win a doubleheader on Staten Island to run their latest winning streak to 12 games and extend their lead in the AA race to 191⁄2 games. New York falls, 20–8 and 7–4.

4th The Mets and Browns try and stage a Sunday game at Monitor Park in Weehawken, NJ. But the field is in bad shape and the crowd is much too large for the facilities, so only an exhibition game is played. St. Louis CF Curt Welch is knocked out of action for a week when he is hit in the head with a bat that slips out of the hands of teammate Tip O’Neill.

5th  Chicago wins the opening game of their final series against league-leading Detroit 11–7. John Clarkson picks up his 9th victory over the Wolverines, the most ever by a pitcher over a pennant-winning team.

In New York, the Browns (AA) lose to the Metropolitans, 6-5. St. Louis star Tip O’Neill connects for an extra base hit in his 12th straight game: 14 doubles, 3 triples, 2 homers. According to historian Trent McCotter, this includes 12 straight games where he scored a run, had an RBI, and had an extra base hit. Bobby Abreau, in 2005, will do the same in 10 straight games. O’Neill consecutive extra-base hit skein will be topped in 1927 by Paul Waner (14 games).

7th  Detroit gets sweet revenge against Clarkson and the White Stockings, beating them twice, 8–2 and 8–4, while amassing 34 hits. The defeat pushes the 2nd-place Chicagos 7 games behind.

Billy Otterson hits a 4th inning grand slam, off Mike Morrison, as Brooklyn spanks Cleveland, 16-3 (as noted by David Vincent).

11th  The Mets successfully stage a Sunday “home” game in Weehawken, NJ, losing to the Colonels 10–6.

The St. Louis Browns players refuse to play an exhibition game versus the all-black Cuban Giants team, stating in a letter to the owner that “we will cheerfully play against white people at any time and think that by refusing to play [blacks] we are only doing what is right.” Arlie Latham is singled out as the leader of the recalcitrant players and is fined.

13th  Jimmy Ryan goes 6-for-6 for Chicago with a single, double, HR, and 3 walks. He also pitches the final 5 innings in relief of Lady Baldwin to get the win. The White Stockings rally to beat the Phillies, 16–13, overcoming 13 errors committed.

14th  Chicago whips the visiting Phillies, 17–12, for their 3rd win in a row over the Philadelphians. The Phils will not lose for the rest of the season. Adrian “Cap” Anson is 3-for-5, giving him 17 hits in the last 5 games. His hot streak will win him the NL batting title with an official .421 average (without walks, which are counted as hits, Sam Thompson would have won the title with a .372 mark).

15th For the 2nd day in a row, the Reds play a morning game in Staten Island, NY, against the Mets and an afternoon game in Brooklyn. The Mets play Cleveland in the p.m. game, losing both games. The Reds Tony Mullane pitches his 5th shutout of the year, winning 4–0, against the Mets to tie the ML season record of a pitcher against one team (Lady Baldwin, 1886). The Reds (AA) beat Brooklyn, 11–1, in the p.m. game.

18th Doc Bushong catches for the Browns for the first time since suffering a broken finger on July 1. But he’ll never regain the form that made him the best defensive catcher in the AA. The Browns win, 6-4 over visiting Cleveland.

22nd  Elmer Smith of Cincinnati shuts out St. Louis 6–0. The Browns will be blanked in only 2 regular season games, both times by Smith.

28th  Abner Dalrymple hits 2 dramatic HRs in front of his old fans in Chicago, one to tie the game for Pittsburgh in the 8th inning and one to win it 3–2 in the 10th. These are Dalrymple’s only HRs of the season.

30th  Connie Mack singles, steals 2B, and scores on John Irwin’s first NL hit to give Washington a 1–0 victory over New York. Jim Whitney and Tim O’Keefe each strike out 10.